GLORIA

GEOMAR Library Ocean Research Information Access

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Document type
Language
  • 1
    Keywords: Data mining-Congresses. ; Electronic books.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (160 pages)
    Edition: 1st ed.
    ISBN: 9783030488611
    Series Statement: Lecture Notes in Computer Science Series ; v.11948
    DDC: 6.3
    Language: English
    Note: Intro -- Preface -- Organization -- Effective Linear Models for Learning with Sequences and Time Series (Abstract of Invited Talk) -- Contents -- Complex Patterns -- A Framework for Pattern Mining and Anomaly Detection in Multi-dimensional Time Series and Event Logs -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 Method -- 3.1 Time Series Representation for Pattern Mining -- 3.2 Pattern Mining -- 3.3 Pattern-Based Anomaly Detection -- 3.4 Implementation of the Framework -- 4 Use Cases -- 5 Related Work -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- A Heuristic Approach for Sensitive Pattern Hiding with Improved Data Quality -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Related Work: Heuristic Based Algorithms -- 3 Background -- 3.1 Basic Terminologies -- 3.2 Problem Statement -- 4 Proposed Solution: MinMax Algorithm -- 4.1 Time Complexity Analysis -- 4.2 Example -- 5 Experimental Results -- 5.1 Varying Percentage of Sensitive Itemsets -- 5.2 Varying Minimum Support Threshold -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Classification and Regression -- Interpretable Survival Gradient Boosting Models with Bagged Trees Base Learners -- Abstract -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Survival Analysis -- 2.1 Notations -- 2.2 Partial Likelihood -- 2.3 Cox Proportional Hazards Model -- 3 Proposed Method -- 3.1 Gradient Boosting -- 3.2 Additive Representations -- 3.3 Base Learner Function -- 3.4 Loss Function -- 4 Evaluation -- 4.1 Datasets -- 4.2 Methods -- 4.3 Parameters -- 4.4 Concordance Index -- 4.5 Validation -- 5 Results and Discussion -- 5.1 Base Learners -- 5.2 Interpretability -- 5.3 Feature Selection -- 6 Conclusions -- References -- Neural Hybrid Recommender: Recommendation Needs Collaboration -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Neural Hybrid Recommender -- 3 Experiments -- 3.1 Datasets -- 3.2 Handling Text Data -- 3.3 Evaluation Process -- 3.4 Negative Sampling -- 3.5 Baselines -- 3.6 Parameter Setting. , 3.7 Performance Results -- 4 Conclusion -- References -- Discovering Discriminative Nodes for Classification with Deep Graph Convolutional Methods -- 1 Context and Motivation -- 2 Related Work -- 3 Interpreting Graph Convolutional Network Models with Grad-CAM -- 3.1 Graph Sparsification -- 3.2 Deep Graph Convolutional Neural Networks -- 3.3 DGCNN Interpretability -- 4 Experimental Evaluation and Results -- 4.1 Data Generation -- 4.2 Classification Performance Evaluation -- 4.3 Interpretability Heatmaps -- 5 Discussion -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Streams and Times Series -- Soft Voting Windowing Ensembles for Learning from Partially Labelled Streams -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 3 LESS-TWE Online Learning -- 3.1 Hybrid Sliding-Tumbling Windows -- 3.2 Weighted Soft Voting -- 3.3 Online Labelling -- 3.4 Unlabelled Drift Detection -- 4 Experimental Evaluation -- 4.1 Benchmark Data Sets -- 4.2 Effects of Training with a Lower Percentage of Labelled Data -- 4.3 Comparison in Terms of Accuracy and Runtime -- 4.4 Intrusion Detection Databases -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Disentangling Aspect and Opinion Words in Sentiment Analysis Using Lifelong PU Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Related Work -- 3 Stage One: Grouping -- 4 Stage Two: Disentangling -- 4.1 PU Learning Using Word Vectors -- 4.2 Lifelong Machine Learning -- 4.3 Lifelong PU (LPU) Learning -- 5 Experiments -- 5.1 Candidate Methods for Comparison -- 5.2 Experimental Setup -- 5.3 Quantitative Evaluation -- 5.4 Qualitative Evaluation -- 5.5 Further Analysis -- 6 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- Applications -- Customer Purchase Behavior Prediction in E-commerce: A Conceptual Framework and Research Agenda -- Abstract -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Research Methodology -- 3 Results. , 3.1 RQ 1. What Tasks and Applications Have Been Addressed in the Problem of Consumer Purchase Behavior Prediction in E-Commerce? -- 3.2 RQ 2. What Methodologies Have Been Adopted to Predict Consumer Purchase Behavior Online? -- 3.3 State-of-the-Art Performance -- 3.4 Research Agenda -- 4 Final Remarks -- References -- Hough Transform as a Tool for the Classification of Vehicle Speed Changes in On-Road Audio Recordings -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Proposed Approach -- 1.2 Audio Data -- 2 Methodology -- 2.1 Using Hough Transform for Line Detection -- 2.2 Heuristic Methodologies -- 3 Experiments and Results -- 4 Summary -- References -- Author Index.
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-12-08
    Description: The central Italy seismic sequence, started with the Mw = 6.0 Amatrice earthquake on August 24th 2016, is the first significant one after the Italian Seismic Bulletin (BSI) changed its analysis strategies in 2015. These new strategies consist on the release of the BSI every four months, the review of the events with ML ≥ 1.5 and the priority on the review of events with ML ≥ 3.5. Furthermore, in the last year we improved the bulletin tools and made possible the analysis of all the stations whose data are stored in the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA). The new procedures and software utilities allowed, during the first month of 2016 emergency, to integrate, in the Bulletin, the temporary stations installed by the emergency group SISMIKO, both in real–time transmission and in stand-alone recording. In the early days of the sequence many of the BSI analysts were engaged in the monitoring room shifts, nevertheless at the end of August all events occurred in those days with ML ≥ 4 were analyzed; the largest event recovered and localized is a ML = 4.5 event immediately following the main shock. In September 2016, 83 events with ML ≥ 3.5 were analyzed and re-checked, the number of pickings greatly improved. The focal mechanism of the main shock was evaluated using first motion polarities, and compared with the available Time Domain Moment Tensors and Regional Centroid Moment Tensor. The first eight hours of the day on August 24th, the most critical for the INGV surveillance room, were carefully analyzed: the number of located events increased from 133 to 408. The magnitude of completeness, after the analysis of the BSI, has dropped significantly from about 3.5 to 2.7. The mainshock focal mechanism and the relative locations of the first 8 hours’ aftershocks give clues on the initial fault activation. The seismic sequence in November 2016 is still ongoing; it included a mainshock of Mw = 6.5 on October 30th and 3 events of magnitude greater than 5.0 one on August 24th and two on October 26th.
    Print ISSN: 1593-5213
    Topics: Geosciences
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-02-19
    Description: The central Italy seismic sequence, started with the Mw = 6.0 Amatrice earthquake on August 24th 2016, is the first significant one after the Italian Seismic Bulletin (BSI) changed its analysis strategies in 2015. These new strategies consist on the release of the BSI every four months, the review of the events with ML ≥ 1.5 and the priority on the review of events with ML ≥ 3.5. Furthermore, in the last year we improved the bulletin tools and made possible the analysis of all the stations whose data are stored in the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA). The new procedures and software utilities allowed, during the first month of 2016 emergency, to integrate, in the Bulletin, the temporary stations installed by the emergency group SISMIKO, both in real–time transmission and in stand-alone recording. In the early days of the sequence many of the BSI analysts were engaged in the monitoring room shifts, nevertheless at the end of August all events occurred in those days with ML ≥ 4 were analyzed; the largest event recovered and localized is a ML = 4.5 event immediately following the main shock. In September 2016, 83 events with ML ≥ 3.5 were analyzed and re-checked, the number of pickings greatly improved. The focal mechanism of the main shock was evaluated using first motion polarities, and compared with the available Time Domain Moment Tensors and Regional Centroid Moment Tensor. The first eight hours of the day on August 24th, the most critical for the INGV surveillance room, were carefully analyzed: the number of located events increased from 133 to 408. The magnitude of completeness, after the analysis of the BSI, has dropped significantly from about 3.5 to 2.7. The mainshock focal mechanism and the relative locations of the first 8 hours’ aftershocks give clues on the initial fault activation. The seismic sequence in November 2016 is still ongoing; it included a mainshock of Mw = 6.5 on October 30th and 3 events of magnitude greater than 5.0 one on August 24th and two on October 26th.
    Description: Published
    Description: 4IT. Banche dati
    Description: JCR Journal
    Keywords: Central Italy seismic sequence ; Amatrice earthquake August 24th 2016 ; Italian Seismic Bulletin BSI ; 04.06. Seismology
    Repository Name: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)
    Type: article
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-03-22
    Description: The Amatrice-Visso-Norcia seismic sequence is the most important of the last 30 years in Italy. The seismic sequence started on 24 August, 2016 and still is ongoing in central Apennines. At the end of February 2017 more than 57,000 events were located, 80,000 events up to the end of September 2017 (Fig. 1). The mainshocks of the sequence occurred on 24 August 2016 (Mw 6.0 and Mw 5.4), 26 October 2016 (Mw 5.4 and Mw 5.9), 30 October 2016 (Mw 6.5), 18 January 2017 (four earthquakes Mw≥ 5.0). In this seismic sequence, all the waveforms recorded by temporary stations deployed by the SISMIKO emergency group (stations T12**; Moretti et al., 2016) where available in real- time at the surveillance room of INGV. Because of the high level of seismicity and the dense seismic network installed in the region, more than 150 events per day were located at the end of February 2017; still 60 events per day were located up to the end of August 2017.The Amatrice-Visso-Norcia is the most important seismic sequence since 2015, the time when the analysis procedures of the BSI group (Bollettino Sismico Italiano) were revised (Nardi et al., 2015). BSI is now available every four months on the web: bulletins contain revised earthquakes (location and magnitude) with ML≥ 1.5, quasi-real time revision of ML≥ 3.5 earthquakes and phase arrivals from waveforms recorded on seismic stations available from the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA), (Mazza et al., 2012). These last procedures allow the integration of signals from temporary seismic stations (Moretti et al., 2014) installed by the emergency group SISMIKO (Moretti and Sismiko working group, 2016), even when they are not in real time transmission, if they are rapidly archived in EIDA, together with real time signals from the seismic stations of the permanent INGV network. The analysis strategy of the BSI group for the Amatrice -Visso - Norcia seismic sequence (AVN.s.s in the following) was to select the earthquakes located in the box with min/max latitude: 42.2/43.2 - and min/max longitude: 12.4/14.1 to prepare a special volume of BSI on the seismic sequence.
    Description: Published
    Description: Trieste, Italy
    Description: 1SR. TERREMOTI - Servizi e ricerca per la Società
    Keywords: seismic data analysis ; Central Italy 2016 seismic sequence ; Bollettino Sismico Italiano
    Repository Name: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)
    Type: Conference paper
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2020-12-03
    Description: We present the first high-quality catalog of early aftershocks of the three mainshocks of the 2016 central Italy Amatrice-Visso-Norcia normal faulting sequence. We located 10,574 manually picked aftershocks with a robust probabilistic, non-linear method achieving a significant improvement in the solution accuracy and magnitude completeness with respect to previous studies. Aftershock distribution and relocated mainshocks give insight into the complex architecture of major causative and subsidiary faults, thus providing crucial constraints on multi-segment rupture models. We document reactivation and kinematic inversion of a WNW-dipping listric structure, referable to the inherited Mts Sibillini Thrust (MST) that controlled segmentation of the causative normal faults. Spatial partitioning of aftershocks evidences that the MST lateral ramp had a dual control on rupture propagation, behaving as a barrier for the Amatrice and Visso mainshocks, and later as an asperity for the Norcia mainshock. We hypothesize that the Visso mainshock re-activated also the deep part of an optimally oriented preexisting thrust. Aftershock patterns reveal that the Amatrice Mw5.4 aftershock and the Norcia mainshock ruptured two distinct antithetic faults 3-4 km apart. Therefore, our results suggest to consider both the MST cross structure and the subsidiary antithetic fault in the finite-fault source modelling of the Norcia earthquake.
    Description: Published
    Description: 6921
    Description: 4T. Sismicità dell'Italia
    Description: JCR Journal
    Keywords: 2016 Amatrice-Visso-Norcia seismic sequence (central Italy) ; high-quality catalog of early Aftershocks ; 04.06. Seismology
    Repository Name: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)
    Type: article
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2023-06-28
    Description: Introduction In November 2022 a seismic sequence occurred in the Marche offshore, about 29 km from the coast and the city of Fano. The sequence started on November 9 (06:07:25 UTC) with a ML=5.7 earthquake (Mw=5.5 from TDMD computation, Scognamiglio et al., 2006), immediately followed by a ML=5.2 earthquake (06:08:29 UTC) located about 8 km to the south. The two mainshocks activated a seismic sequence with about 400 aftershocks lasting the first week, 13 of them with ML〉= 3.5 (Fig. 1). Few hours after the occurrence of the mainshock, the BSI (“Bollettino Sismico Italiano”) working group started to manually analyze P and S phase arrival times and seismogram amplitudes of earthquakes with magnitude ML〉= 3.5 recorded by the the Italian National Seismic Network (Rete Sismica Nazionale, hereafter RSN) in order to better constrain hypocenter locations previously provided by the seismic surveillance room of the INGV in Rome for rapid communication to the Italian Civil Protection (Dipartimento Protezione Civile, DPC). Later, the BSI working group analyzed the seismicity of the sequence of the first weeks of seismic activity by revising hypocentral parameters of more than 500 events. The 2022 Marche offshore sequence took place along the Adriatic outer front of the northern Apennines in central Italy. Offshore seismic reflection profiles image a shallow thrust-and-fold system striking WNW–ESE to NNW–SSE. Along the coastal Adriatic area, active blind thrusts deform Plio-Quaternary siliciclastic turbidites that are few hundreds of meters to more than 2 km thick in correspondence of ramp anticlines and synclines, respectively. In a recent work, through the analysis of high-quality background seismicity data, De Nardis et al. (2022) identified two lithospheric-scale active thrusts deepening westward under the Adriatic outer front from upper- to lower-crustal depths. These new data support previous thick-skinned interpretations of seismic commercial profiles and CROP03 deep reflection data (Lavecchia et al., 2003). Focal mechanisms of weak to moderate (ML 〈 4.8) local earthquakes occurred between 2009-2017 at upper- to deep-crustal depths show prevailing reverse and reverse/oblique solutions (De Nardis et al., 2022) and subordinate strike-slip faulting (Mazzoli et al., 2014). The analysis of the 2022 Marche offshore sequence opens again the discussion on the uncertainties related to the hypocenter locations of earthquakes that occur in the Adriatic offshore domain (e.g., Di Stefano et al., 2022) and the limits of our present capability to provide an accurate seismotectonic interpretation of the instrumental seismicity in this region. Actually, the 2022 sequence area is only covered on land by RSN, with the closest seismic station located at about 28 km from the epicentral location of the mainshock. The particular geometry of the network along the Italian coast makes it difficult to correctly constrain hypocenter locations compared with other regions of Italy. Taking into account this configuration, although the INGV is able to obtain coherent earthquake information for Civil Protection purposes into the limits of the communication threshold, we note that data provided by the seismic surveillance room in terms of both seismic phase readings of arrival times for hypocenter location and waveform amplitudes for magnitude computation need to a more accurate analysis if the main goal is the correct reconstruction of the active structures involved in the sequence. This analysis should include a) a careful revision of the arrival time pickings to reduce the errors due to seismic phase misinterpretations, b) an accurate study to constrain earthquake locations with appropriate velocity models, and c) the hypocenter solution assessment through adequate tests that define which information can be inferred from earthquake location results. Data analysis and phases interpretation Through the interpretation of the seismic records, the BSI analysts have identified refracted first arrivals of P and S phases at epicentral distances of about 60 km, smaller than those expected for Pn/Sn refracted phases at the Moho discontinuity (e.g., Di Stefano and Ciaccio, 2014) whose arrivals should be observed at distances of about 90-100 km in this area. Since possible systematic misinterpretation of P and S arrivals can strongly affect the correct hypocenter locations, we have carefully revised the phase pickings provided by the INGV surveillance room by discriminating direct from refracted phases at stations located at distances greater than 60 km. This is mainly important for interpretation of weak S refracted phases that are often hidden into the arrivals after the P phase. We have taken into account these characteristics in the earthquake location process by only using clear direct/refracted S phases in our inversion procedure. The comparison of the ML〉= 3.5 hypocenter locations performed by the BSI and the INGV surveillance room (Figs. 1 and 2) shows how an accurate analysis of the pickings is necessary to obtain robust earthquake locations for seismotectonic interpretation: even using the same hypocenter location code and velocity model, we observe that the mislocation of the hypocenters in this area can range from few to about 10 kilometers (Fig. 1) while the formal errors are strongly reduced after the BSI picking revision (Fig. 2) The velocity model issue Events location in the Adriatic Sea suffers from the lack of a specific velocity model for the seismic sequence area. The use of inadequate velocity parameters during the location process can introduce systematic errors, which may result in incorrect seismotectonic interpretations. We therefore built and tested different velocity models from both available geophysical data and our inversion of the velocity structure using the arrival time readings revised by the BSI working group. In order to define deterministic 1D models suitable for earthquake location (Vp and Vp/Vs), we integrated sonic logs from local deep wells (ViDEPI Project, 2005) with literature data that include: seismic commercial profiles, deep seismic refraction surveys, the CROP03 crustal profile, Receiver Function and regional seismic tomography models, Vp/Vs reference values for mid- and lower-crustal crystalline rocks (Coward et al., 1999; Ponziani et al., 1995; Lavecchia et al., 2003; Spada et al., 2013; Di Stefano et al., 2009, Christiansen and Mooney, 1993). In order to obtain the velocity structure from our revised dataset, we first determined the Vp/Vs ratio by using the arrival time pickings of selected P and S phases. The mean velocity ratio Vp/Vs was computed through the cumulative Wadati diagram. Then, by collecting all the a priori available information regarding the structure of Adriatic Sea (velocities, layer thicknesses and Moho depth), we applied the VELEST software (Kissling, 1995) to compute a new 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Conclusions In this work we present our first analyses of the sequence and the accurate study of the velocity models that we obtained from both a revision of available data and the inversion of arrival time pickings analyzed by the BSI analists. Moreover, we will discuss our preliminary earthquake locations with a particular attention to resolution analysis and hypocenter location assessment.
    Description: Published
    Description: Bologna, Italy
    Description: 4T. Sismicità dell'Italia
    Keywords: Marche offshore ; Seismic sequence ; 04.06. Seismology
    Repository Name: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)
    Type: Conference paper
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-10-23
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , isiRev
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2022-11-09
    Description: Lagrangian connectivity studies with ocean models comprise the analysis of sets of virtual fluid particle trajectories to identify connecting pathways, as well as associated timescales and transports between distinct oceanic regions. They constitute a powerful tool in physical oceanography and a unique means to coherently study seawater pathways associated with the global overturning circulation (GOC). However, there are several open questions related to the (partially unresolved) impact of small-scale flow variability on large-scale Lagrangian connectivity measures. This doctoral dissertation addresses different aspects of the question how high-resolution ocean models can help improving our understanding of the spreading of water masses associated with the global overturning circulation, by: (i) reviewing the theoretical background of Lagrangian connectivity studies with ocean models, thereby highlighting the importance to distinguish Lagrangian analyzes of simulated purely advective volume transport trajectories from Lagrangian modeling approaches to estimate advective-diffusive tracer trajectories; (ii) investigating Lagrangian volume transport pathways and along-track tracer changes of the GOC’s upper limb in the South Atlantic (study 1) and Indian Ocean (study 2) with high-resolution models; and (iii) assessing the performance of near-surface particle dispersal simulations in the extended Agulhas Current system by means of lateral eddy diffusivity estimates (study 3). The major aim of study 1 was to revisit the relative importance of the different sources for the GOC’s upper limb in the South Atlantic, that are, waters entering from the Indian Ocean through the Agulhas Current system versus waters entering from the Pacific through Drake Passage. To do so, backward trajectory calculations from the North Brazil Current have been employed. They revealed a substantially higher volumetric contribution of waters originating at Drake Passage than estimated by previous Lagrangian studies with coarser resolution models. Moreover, the majority of waters with Drake Passage and Agulhas origin experiences substantial water property modifications along their transit through the South Atlantic. A first analysis of temporal changes in the ratio of the two contributions further indicates that an ongoing increase in Agulhas leakage may evoke an increase in the Agulhas contribution to the upper limb of the Atlantic part of the GOC, while the Drake Passage contribution decreases. In study 2 the Agulhas Current contribution to the GOC’s upper limb was further decomposed into its different sources from the Indian Ocean. It constitutes the first coherent Lagrangian analysis of large-scale connectivity associated with the upper limb return flow from the Pacific via the Indian Ocean into the Atlantic. The analysis highlights the dominant contribution of surface-bound Indonesian Throughflow waters that salinify and cool during their transit through the South Atlantic. Additionally, it reports a relative high contribution of intermediate water with origin South of Australia, which largely maintain their properties during transit. Study 3 presents an analysis of near-surface lateral eddy diffusivity estimates obtained from Lagrangian trajectories simulated with a high resolution model for the greater Agulhas system. It further includes the first comparison of eddy diffusivity estimates from simulated Lagrangian trajectories and observed drifter trajectories for that region. Notably, eddy diffusivity estimates from the high-resolution model are consistent with the spatial pattern and magnitude of drifter-based eddy diffusivity estimates — without the need for an additional diffusion parametrization in the trajectory calculation. Overall, these studies contributed to a revised picture of large-scale connectivity associated with the GOC and yielded new insights regarding the suitability of Lagrangian analyzes for assessing large-scale spreading of water masses. In particular, the presented studies highlight the benefits of Lagrangian analyzes to investigate the simulated flow field of ocean models in terms of volume transport pathways and timescales, as well as net water mass transformations. At the same time they indicate that Lagrangian analyzes are of limited use for assessing the pathways and timescales with that upper ocean temperature as well as salinity anomalies may be transmitted through the Indian and South Atlantic oceans, if the virtual fluid particles experience non-negligible along-track water property modifications.
    Type: Thesis , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2022-02-25
    Description: In this study, we investigate the oscillations of relative sea level through the analysis of tide gauge records about 10-year long collected in the Gulfs of Pozzuoli and Napoli (Southern Italy). The main goal of this study is to provide a suitable resolution model of the sea tides including low frequency (seiches), tidal bands and non-linear tides. The spectral analyses of the tide gauge records lead us to identify a number of seiche periods some of them already known from the literature and some other unknown. Furthermore, we target a non-conventional purpose of the tidal analysis, namely extracting from the tide gauge records the volcanotectonic signal (vertical ground displacement) in the resurgent Campi Flegrei caldera. We suggest a method to filter out the volcano-tectonic signal (bradyseism) from the tide gauge records by deconvolving it from two records, one collected in the active volcanic area (Pozzuoli) and the other one collected in a tectonically stable station (Napoli), located beyond the caldera rim. Finally, we retrieve the relative mean sea level change in the Gulf of Naples and compare it with the trend found in five tide gauges spread along the Italian coast.
    Description: This research has been partially supported by the Dipartimento della Protezione Civile Italiana (DPC – Italian Civil Protection Department) and the MUR (Ministero dell’Università e della Ricerca, INGV Pianeta Dinamico project (code INGV 1020.010), Task V1 – 2020).
    Description: Published
    Description: 105-118
    Description: 4V. Processi pre-eruttivi
    Description: 7A. Geofisica per il monitoraggio ambientale
    Description: N/A or not JCR
    Repository Name: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV)
    Type: article
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...