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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-11-11
    Description: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014 Source: International Journal of Production Economics Author(s): Klaus Reinholdt Nyhuus Hansen , Martin Grunow Shorter product life cycles and the resulting increase in new product introductions boost the importance of product launch operations. In the pharmaceutical sector, product launch operations are of particular importance, as companies seek to reduce time-to-market to better exploit patent protection. Large volumes of product need to be ready to fill the downstream supply chain immediately at market launch. Building up the required inventory is, however, connected to several risks. In addition to the risk associated with the lack of demand information for a new product, there are several risks unique to the pharmaceutical sector. After approval by central authorities such as the FDA or EMA, a new drug still needs to receive market authorization, which is in most cases granted by some local authorities - in Europe, for example, by more than 30 national and regional bodies. The duration of these different market authorization processes as well as their outcomes (e.g. price and reimbursement levels, requirements of label or leaflet changes) are highly uncertain. We develop a two-stage stochastic model to support market launch preparation decisions. It trades off the costs of accepting these risks, for example by risk packaging before authorization, against the lost revenue caused by risk-averse operations. The model is applied to a case based on an empirical study. Our approach results in significant savings compared to current practices. We hereby provide an example of how quantitative methodology can provide valuable decision support for product launch operations, even when complex regulatory affairs need to be considered.
    Print ISSN: 0925-5273
    Electronic ISSN: 1873-7579
    Topics: Technology , Economics
    Published by Elsevier
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2024-02-07
    Description: Coastal countries have traditionally relied on the existing marine resources (e.g., fishing, food, transport, recreation, and tourism) as well as tried to support new economic endeavors (ocean energy, desalination for water supply, and seabed mining). Modern societies and lifestyle resulted in an increased demand for dietary diversity, better health and well-being, new biomedicines, natural cosmeceuticals, environmental conservation, and sustainable energy sources. These societal needs stimulated the interest of researchers on the diverse and underexplored marine environments as promising and sustainable sources of biomolecules and biomass, and they are addressed by the emerging field of marine (blue) biotechnology. Blue biotechnology provides opportunities for a wide range of initiatives of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical, biomedical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food, feed, agricultural, and related industries. This article synthesizes the essence, opportunities, responsibilities, and challenges encountered in marine biotechnology and outlines the attainment and valorization of directly derived or bio-inspired products from marine organisms. First, the concept of bioeconomy is introduced. Then, the diversity of marine bioresources including an overview of the most prominent marine organisms and their potential for biotechnological uses are described. This is followed by introducing methodologies for exploration of these resources and the main use case scenarios in energy, food and feed, agronomy, bioremediation and climate change, cosmeceuticals, bio-inspired materials, healthcare, and well-being sectors. The key aspects in the fields of legislation and funding are provided, with the emphasis on the importance of communication and stakeholder engagement at all levels of biotechnology development. Finally, vital overarching concepts, such as the quadruple helix and Responsible Research and Innovation principle are highlighted as important to follow within the marine biotechnology field. The authors of this review are collaborating under the European Commission-funded Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action Ocean4Biotech – European transdisciplinary networking platform for marine biotechnology and focus the study on the European state of affairs.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
    Format: image
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2023-02-08
    Description: Marine organisms produce a vast diversity of metabolites with biological activities useful for humans, e.g., cytotoxic, antioxidant, anti-microbial, insecticidal, herbicidal, anticancer, pro-osteogenic and pro-regenerative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant, cholesterol-lowering, nutritional, photoprotective, horticultural or other beneficial properties. These metabolites could help satisfy the increasing demand for alternative sources of nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, cosmeceuticals, food, feed, and novel bio-based products. In addition, marine biomass itself can serve as the source material for the production of various bulk commodities (e.g., biofuels, bioplastics, biomaterials). The sustainable exploitation of marine bio-resources and the development of biomolecules and polymers are also known as the growing field of marine biotechnology. Up to now, over 35,000 natural products have been characterized from marine organisms, but many more are yet to be uncovered, as the vast diversity of biota in the marine systems remains largely unexplored. Since marine biotechnology is still in its infancy, there is a need to create effective, operational, inclusive, sustainable, transnational and transdisciplinary networks with a serious and ambitious commitment for knowledge transfer, training provision, dissemination of best practices and identification of the emerging technological trends through science communication activities. A collaborative (net)work is today compelling to provide innovative solutions and products that can be commercialized to contribute to the circular bioeconomy. This perspective article highlights the importance of establishing such collaborative frameworks using the example of Ocean4Biotech, an Action within the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) that connects all and any stakeholders with an interest in marine biotechnology in Europe and beyond.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Format: archive
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  • 4
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    Alfred-Wegener-Institut
    In:  EPIC3Communications and Media Relations, Bremerhaven, Alfred-Wegener-Institut, 360 p.
    Publication Date: 2019-07-17
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Outreach , notRev
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 5
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    Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
    In:  Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany, 118 pp.
    Publication Date: 2020-09-30
    Description: 2006 - 2019
    Type: Report , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
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