GLORIA

GEOMAR Library Ocean Research Information Access

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Immunohistochemistry  (4)
  • Human  (3)
  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Cytoplasmic body myopathy ; Immunohistochemistry ; Desmin ; Intermediate filaments ; Actin filaments
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary In a fine structural and immunocytochemical study, the latter performed on semithin sections of epoxy resin embedded skeletal muscle fibers, three types of cytoplasmic bodies were identified in a case of cytoplasmic body myopathy: (1) The first type, the classical type, showed a central core and a light halo with radiating actin filaments at the periphery. (2) The second type, the spheroid body was characterized by irregularly arranged granular masses associated with intermediate filaments. Desmin immunoreactivity occurred in the central and peripheral parts, where filaments of intermediate size were visualized by electron microscopy. Desmin immunoreactivity was noted also at the Z-bands of striated annulets, within areas of disordered myofibrils, such as sarcoplasmic masses, and in atrophic muscle fibers. (3) The third type of the cytoplasmic body was composed mainly of large masses of uneven granularity and electron density. The center of this type reacted to anti-actin antibody suggesting that the 5- to 6-nm filaments, which ultrastructurally proved to be a major component, were of the actin type. By contrast, neither intermediate filaments nor actin microfilaments were found by electron microscopy in cytoplasmic bodies in a second case where no immunoreaction to desmin or actin occurred. Anti-vimentin antibody stained only the cytoplasm of endomysial cells, but not the inclusion bodies. Some other, unusual inclusions with 18- to 20-nm tubulo-filamentous structures have to be distinguished from the various types of filaments in cytoplasmic bodies. It is concluded, that pleomorphism and heterogeneity of “cytoplasmic bodies” have to be taken into consideration when classifying cytoplasmic body myopathies.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Key words B-50(GAP-43) ; Spinal cord ; Human
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract B-50(GAP-43) is a phosphoprotein mainly found in the nervous system which plays a major role in neurite growth during development and regeneration as well as in synaptic remodelling. In the mature intact central nervous system, intense B-50 immunoreactivity (B-50-IR) can still be detected in regions which maintain residual capacity for structural re-organization. B-50 expression has been studied extensively in laboratory animals; however, its distribution and regulation in the human spinal cord is largely unknown. As a first step to analyze lesion-induced structural alterations, we investigated the distribution of B-50 protein and mRNA in the normal adult human spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Intense B-50-IR was localized to the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn at all segmental levels, the intermediolateral nucleus at thoracic levels and Onuf’s nucleus at sacral levels. Scattered neurons, particularly in the ventral horn of lumbar and sacral segmental levels (and occasionally also in Clarke’s nucleus) displayed intense B-50-IR in close apposition to the perikaryal and proximal dendritic surfaces. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization indicated that B-50 mRNA could also be detected in neurons of the ventral horn and also in the intermediolateral nucleus. The distribution of B-50 mRNA and protein in the normal human spinal cord shows a marked similarity to that reported in experimental animals, including the selective labelling of Onuf’s nucleus. However, the strong B-50-IR on the surface of some large anterior horn motor neurons has not been observed in other mammals. This finding might reflect a particular state of readiness for synaptic plasticity.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Key words: Perineurial cells ; Nerve regeneration ; Immunohistochemistry ; Epithelial membrane antigen
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Perineurial cells are specialized connective tissue cells that form a barrier between endoneurium and epineurium in normal nerves. In the present study, the formation of the perineurium after transection of rat sciatic nerves was investigated. The cord bridging the gap between proximal and distal stumps through silicone tubes was studied 3, 7, 12, 18, and 21 days after surgery using electron microscopy and antibodies against epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), a marker for perineurial cells that has thus far not been applied to the study of differentiating cells in nerve tubulation systems. Initially, a thin cord consisting of fibrin bridged the gap between the stumps. At 7 days, longitudinal cells had migrated from both stumps toward the center of the tubes on the surface of the fibrin cord. These cells were immunoreactive with anti-EMA. At 12 days, ultrastructural features of perineurial cells (desmosomes, tight junctions, actin filaments with dense bodies, tonofilaments) were prominent in these cells. Subsequently, the gap was bridged through the perineurial tube by endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblasts, Schwann cells, and axons. At 21 days, a single large nerve fascicle ensheathed by a mature perineurium was found between the stumps. Thus, the first cells to connect proximal and distal stumps in the investigated nerve regeneration silicon chamber system are perineurial cells. Through the tube formed by these cells, blood vessels and nerve fibers bridge the gap. Therefore, establishment of a perineurial connection between nerve stumps appears to be important in the sequence of events during nerve regeneration.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Perineurial cells ; Nerve regeneration ; Immunohistochemistry ; Epithelial membrane antigen
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Perineurial cells are specialized connective tissue cells that form a barrier between endoneurium and epineurium in normal nerves. In the present study, the formation of the perineurium after transection of rat sciatic nerves was investigated. The cord bridging the gap between proximal and distal stumps through silicone tubes was studied 3, 7, 12, 18, and 21 days after surgery using electron microscopy and antibodies against epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), a marker for perineurial cells that has thus far not been applied to the study of differentiating cells in nerve tubulation systems. Initially, a thin cord consisting of fibrin bridged the gap between the stumps. At 7 days, longitudinal cells had migrated from both stumps toward the center of the tubes on the surface of the fibrin cord. These cells were immunoreactive with anti-EMA. At 12 days, ultrastructural features of perineurial cells (desmosomes, tight junctions, actin filaments with dense bodies, tonofilaments) were prominent in these cells. Subsequently, the gap was bridged through the perineurial tube by endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblasts, Schwann cells, and axons. At 21 days, a single large nerve fascicle ensheathed by a mature perineurium was found between the stumps. Thus, the first cells to connect proximal and distal stumps in the investigated nerve regeneration silicon chamber system are perineurial cells. Through the tube formed by these cells, blood vessels and nerve fibers bridge the gap. Therefore, establishment of a perineurial connection between nerve stumps appears to be important in the sequence of events during nerve regeneration.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-1459
    Keywords: Mitochondrial myopathy ; Ragged-red fibres ; Immunohistochemistry
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary An immunohistochemical method is reported using the M-II68 monoclonal antibody, which detects mitochondrial accumulations (“ragged-red fibres”) in routinely processed (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded) muscle tissue. Ten cases with electron-microscopically and histochemically proven mitochondrial myopathy featured 4% to 24% ragged-red fibres. In a series of 50 muscle biopsies without mitochondrial myopathy, scattered ragged-red fibres (〈0.1%) were present in a few normal and pathological muscles. The immunohistochemical method is specific for mitochondria, does not require frozen tissue and permits rapid examination of large areas.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Cell & tissue research 290 (1997), S. 31-37 
    ISSN: 1432-0878
    Keywords: Key words: Sural nerve ; Blood vessels ; Angiopathic neuropathy ; Vasculitis ; Peripheral neuropathy ; Human
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract. The number and dimensions of epineurial blood vessels in normal human sural nerves have, thus far, not been determined using systematic, reproducible morphometric methods, although this nerve is most frequently used for diagnostic biopsies. Quantitative changes in epineurial blood vessels appear to be major parameters for identifying angiopathy and angiopathic peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, we examined the epineurial blood-vessel number in relation to the age of the patients and to the number and size of the nerve fascicles in each of 51 human sural nerve biopsies. The data from a control group were compared with pathological cases. We found that the number of epineurial blood vessels (normal mean: 57.7) increased significantly (up to 196) in biopsies where there were signs of angiopathy (P≤0.01) or vasculitis (P≤0.05). The increase in the number of epineurial blood vessels usually resulted from a proliferation of capillaries. The fascicular cross-sectional area did not appear to be related to the number of epineurial blood vessels, although it increased significantly in cases with vasculitis (P≤0.05) or an axonal type of neuropathy (P≤0.05). Thus, this study shows that the number of epineurial blood vessels is a helpful parameter in verifying angiopathy and angiopathic peripheral neuropathy.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Cell & tissue research 273 (1993), S. 499-509 
    ISSN: 1432-0878
    Keywords: Ranvier's node ; Development ; Sural nerve ; Axon ; Myelin sheath ; Paranodal junctions ; Human
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Developmental alterations of paranodal fiber segments have not been investigated systematically in human nerve fibers at the light- and electron-microscopic level. We have therefore analyzed developmental changes in the fine structure of the paranode in 43 human sural nerves during the axonal growth period up to 5 years of age, and during the subsequent myelin development up to 20 years and thereafter. The nodal, internodal, and paranodal axon diameters reach their adult values at 4–5 years of age. The ratio between internodal and paranodal axon diameters remains constant at 1.8–2.0. Despite a considerable increase in myelin sheath thickness, the length of the paranodal myelin sheath attachment zone at the axon does not increase correspondingly, because of attenuation, separation from the axolemma, and piling up of myelin loops in the paranode. Separation of variable numbers of terminal myelin loops from the underlying axolemma results in the formation of bracelets of Nageotte, whereas the transverse bands of these loops disappear. The adaptation of the paranodal myelin sheath to axonal expansion during development probably occurs by uneven gliding of the paranodal myelin loops simultaneously with internodal slippage of myelin lamellae. Since mechanically stabilizing structures (tight junctions and desmosomes between adjacent paranodal myelin processes; transverse bands between myelin loops and paranodal axolemma) are unevenly arranged, especially during rapid axonal growth, paranodal axonal growth with simultaneous adaptation of the myelin sheath is probably discontinuous with time.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...