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  • 1
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    San Diego :Elsevier Science & Technology,
    Keywords: Traps (Petroleum geology). ; Electronic books.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (493 pages)
    Edition: 1st ed.
    ISBN: 9780080466811
    Series Statement: Issn Series ; v.Volume 61
    DDC: 553.28
    Language: English
    Note: Intro -- Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1. Basic principles and applications of reservoir characterization -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Integrating expertise for reservoir characterization -- 1.3 Oil and gas: the main sources of global energy -- 1.4 The added value of reservoir characterization -- 1.5 Compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs -- 1.6 Depositional environments and types of deposits -- 1.7 When is reservoir characterization important in the life cycle of a field? -- 1.8 The value of case studies -- Chapter 2. Tools and techniques for characterizing oil and gas reservoirs -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Measuring properties at different scales -- 2.3 Computers and the computing environment -- 2.4 Seismic-reflection and subsurface imaging -- 2.5 Drilling and sampling a well -- 2.6 Summary -- Chapter 3. Basic sedimentary rock properties -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Classification and properties of sediments and sedimentary rocks -- 3.3 Sedimentary structures and their significance -- 3.4 Summary -- Chapter 4. Geologic time and stratigraphy -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 North American geologic time scale -- 4.3 Determining the time frame in which a rock formed -- 4.4 Micropaleontology and biostratigraphy in reservoir characterization -- 4.5 Walther's law and the succession of sedimentary facies -- 4.6 Summary -- Chapter 5. Geologic controls on reservoir quality -- 5.1 Definitions -- 5.2 Examination and measurement of porosity and permeability -- 5.3 Primary grain-size control on reservoir quality -- 5.4 Diagenesis and reservoir quality -- 5.5 Flow-unit characterization for correlation and upscaling -- 5.6 Capillary pressure and its applications to reservoir characterization -- 5.7 Seismic porosity measurement -- 5.8 Summary. , Chapter 6. Fluvial deposits and reservoirs -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Braided fluvial (river) deposits and reservoirs -- 6.3 Meandering-river deposits and reservoirs -- 6.4 Incised-valley-fill deposits and reservoirs -- 6.5 Combination fluvial reservoirs -- 6.6 Summary -- Chapter 7. Eolian (windblown) deposits and reservoirs -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Processes and deposits -- 7.3 Reservoir examples -- 7.4 Summary -- Chapter 8. Nondeltaic, shallow marine deposits and reservoirs -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Shallow marine processes and environments -- 8.3 Shallow marine deposits -- 8.4 Shallow marine reservoirs -- 8.5 Barrier island deposits and reservoirs -- 8.6 Summary -- Chapter 9. Deltaic deposits and reservoirs -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 General deltaic processes, environments (physiographic zones), and types -- 9.3 River-dominated delta deposits and reservoirs -- 9.4 Wave-dominated deltas -- 9.5 Tide-dominated deltas -- 9.6 Summary -- Chapter 10. Deepwater deposits and reservoirs -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Sedimentary processes operative in deep water -- 10.3 Depositional models -- 10.4 Architectural elements of deepwater deposits -- 10.5 Summary -- Chapter 11. Sequence stratigraphy for reservoir characterization -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Basic definitions and concepts -- 11.3 Developing a sequence stratigraphic framework -- 11.4 High-frequency sequence stratigraphy -- 11.5 Summary -- Chapter 12. An example of integrated characterization for reservoir development and exploration: Northeast Betara field, Jabung Subbasin, South Sumatra, Indonesia -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 History of Northeast Betara field -- 12.3 Field characteristics -- 12.4 Depositional model -- 12.5 Sequence stratigraphy -- 12.6 Field development plan -- 12.7 Conclusions and applications -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Index.
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  • 2
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    New York, NY :Springer,
    Keywords: Shale--Atlases. ; Electronic books.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (147 pages)
    Edition: 1st ed.
    ISBN: 9781461234227
    Language: English
    Note: Argillaceous Rock Atlas -- Copyright -- PREFACE -- CONTENTS -- CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION -- CHAPTER 2 FABRIC ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES -- CHAPTER 3 X-RADIOGRAPHY, PETROGRAPHY AND SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY DESCRIPTIONS -- CHAPTER 4 MISCELLANEOUS FEATURES IN ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS -- CHAPTER 5 CASE STUDIES OF SPECIFIC DISTINCTIVE FEATURES -- CHAPTER 6 CASE STUDIES OF FABRIC ANALYSIS IN EVALUATING SEDIMENTARY PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENTS -- CHAPTER 7 FORMATION OF SHALE BY COMPACTION OF FLOCCULATED CLAY--A MODEL -- CHAPTER 8 FABRICS OF SOME HYDROCARBON SOURCE ROCKS AND OIL SHALES -- CHAPTER 9 FABRIC OF GEOPRESSURED SHALE -- CHAPTER 10 COMPOSITION OF ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS -- CHAPTER 11 CONCLUSIONS -- REFERENCES -- INDEX.
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  • 3
    Keywords: Oil reservoir engineering. ; Electronic books.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (688 pages)
    Edition: 2nd ed.
    ISBN: 9780444563705
    Series Statement: Issn Series ; v.Volume 61
    DDC: 553.28
    Language: English
    Note: Front Cover -- Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers: Origin, Recognition, Init ... -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Preface -- Series Editor's Preface -- Chapter 1: Basic Principles and Applications of Reservoir Characterization -- 1.1. General Introduction -- 1.2. Integrating Expertise for Reservoir Characterization -- 1.3. Oil and Gas: The Main Sources of Global Energy -- 1.3.1. Resources and Reserves -- 1.3.2. Predicting the Remaining Resource -- 1.3.3. The Global Energy Resource -- 1.3.4. The ``Shale Gale´´ -- 1.3.5. Gas Hydrates (Clathrates) -- 1.3.6. Energy Consumption -- 1.4. The Added Value of Reservoir Characterization -- 1.4.1. Examples of Added Value by Reservoir Characterization -- 1.4.2. Brownfields -- 1.5. Compartmentalization of Oil and Gas Reservoirs -- 1.5.1. Compartmentalization: The Exception or the Rule? -- 1.5.2. The Significance of Compartmentalization -- 1.5.3. The Nature of Compartmentalization and Architectural Elements -- 1.6. Clastic Depositional Environments and Types of Deposits -- 1.6.1. Scales and Styles of Geologic Reservoir Heterogeneity -- 1.6.2. Hierarchical Scales of Geologic Heterogeneity (Levels) -- 1.7. When Is Reservoir Characterization Important in the Life Cycle of a Field? -- 1.7.1. The Life Cycle of a Field -- 1.7.2. Applying Reservoir Characterization -- 1.8. The Value of Case Studies -- References -- Chapter 2: Basic Sedimentary Rock Properties -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Classification and Properties of Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks -- 2.2.1. Siliciclastic Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks -- 2.2.1.1. Texture -- 2.2.1.2. Composition -- 2.2.1.3. Porosity and Permeability -- 2.2.1.4. Significance to Reservoirs -- 2.2.2. Chemical and Biogenic Sedimentary Rocks -- 2.3. Sedimentary Structures and Their Significance. , 2.3.1. Physical Sedimentary Structures -- 2.3.1.1. Structures Formed by Currents and Waves -- 2.3.1.2. Structures Formed by Sediment Loading -- 2.3.1.3. Erosional Sedimentary Structures -- 2.3.1.4. Sandstone Injectites -- 2.3.2. Biogenic Sedimentary Structures -- 2.3.2.1. Body Fossils -- 2.3.2.2. Trace Fossils -- 2.3.3. Chemical Sedimentary Structures -- 2.4. Summary -- References -- Chapter 3: Geologic Time and Stratigraphy -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. North American Geologic Time Scale -- 3.3. Determining the Time Frame in Which a Rock Formed -- 3.3.1. Radiometric Age Dating (The Clocks in Rocks) -- 3.3.2. Relative Age Dating -- 3.4. Micropaleontology and Biostratigraphy in Reservoir Characterization -- 3.4.1. High-Resolution Biostratigraphic Zonation (Biozones) -- 3.4.2. High-Resolution Well Log and Seismic Correlation from Biostratigraphy -- 3.4.3. Determining Sedimentation Rates from Biostratigraphy -- 3.4.4. Biostratigraphy and Condensed Sections -- 3.4.5. Biostratigraphy and Depositional Environments -- 3.4.6. Palynology -- 3.5. Walther's Law and the Succession of Sedimentary Facies -- 3.6. Summary -- References -- Chapter 4: Tools and Techniques for Characterizing Oil and Gas Reservoirs -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.1.1. Static and Dynamic Properties of Reservoirs -- 4.2. Measuring Properties at Different Scales -- 4.3. Computers and the Computing Environment -- 4.4. Seismic-Reflection and Subsurface Imaging -- 4.4.1. Two-Dimensional Seismic -- 4.4.2. Three-Dimensional Seismic -- 4.4.3. Four-Dimensional Seismic -- 4.4.4. Spectral Decomposition -- 4.4.5. Seismic Inversion -- 4.4.6. Crosswell Seismic Investigation -- 4.4.7. Multicomponent Seismic Investigation -- 4.4.8. Some Pitfalls in Seismic Analysis -- 4.4.9. Seismic Attribute Analysis (Written by Michael Burnett) -- 4.5. Logging and Sampling a Well -- 4.5.1. Sampling. , 4.5.2. Conventional Logs -- 4.5.3. Unconventional and Specialized Logs -- 4.5.3.1. Borehole-Image Logs -- 4.5.3.2. Dipmeter Logs -- 4.5.3.3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Logs -- 4.5.3.4. Other Specialized Logs -- 4.6. Summary -- References -- Chapter 5: Basics of Sequence Stratigraphy for Reservoir Characterization -- 5.1. Sequence Stratigraphic Approach to Reservoir Characterization -- 5.2. Definitions and Basic Concepts -- 5.2.1. Transgressions and Regressions -- 5.3. Evolution and Applications of Sequence Stratigraphy -- 5.4. Scales of Cyclicity -- 5.5. Procedure for Developing a Sequence Stratigraphic Framework -- 5.6. Summary -- References -- Chapter 6: Geologic Controls on Reservoir Quality -- 6.1. Definitions -- 6.2. Examination and Measurement of Porosity and Permeability -- 6.2.1. Direct Observation -- 6.2.2. Direct Measurement -- 6.3. Primary Grain-Size Control on Reservoir Quality -- 6.4. Diagenesis and Reservoir Quality -- 6.5. Flow-Unit Characterization for Correlation and Upscaling -- 6.5.1. Flow Units That Combine Geologic and Petrophysical Properties -- 6.5.2. Gunter et al.s (1997) Method of Flow-Unit Characterization -- 6.5.3. Upscaling Using Flow Units -- 6.6. Capillary Pressure and Its Applications to Reservoir Characterization -- 6.6.1. Principles of Capillary Pressure -- 6.6.2. Routine Laboratory Measurement of Capillary Pressure -- 6.6.3. Relationship of Pc to Pore-Throat Size and Size Distribution -- 6.6.4. Relationships Among Porosity, Permeability, Pore-Throat Size, and Pc -- 6.6.5. Relations Among Capillary Pressure, Grain-Size Distribution, and Water Saturation (Sw) -- 6.6.6. Conversion of Air-Hg Capillary-Pressure Measurements to Reservoir Conditions -- 6.6.7. Free Water Level and Fluid Saturations in a Reservoir -- 6.6.8. Capillarity and Seal Capacity. , 6.6.9. Pore-Throat Size and Capillary Pressure from Conventional Core-Analysis Data -- 6.7. Seismic Porosity Measurement -- 6.8. Summary -- References -- Chapter 7: Fluvial Deposits and Reservoirs -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Braided Fluvial (River) Deposits and Reservoirs -- 7.2.1. Processes and Deposits -- 7.2.2. Reservoir Examples -- 7.2.2.1. Murdoch Field, North Sea -- 7.2.2.2. Rhourde El Baguel Field, Algeria -- 7.2.2.3. Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska -- 7.3. Meandering-River Deposits and Reservoirs -- 7.3.1. Processes and Deposits -- 7.3.2. Reservoir Examples -- 7.3.2.1. Rulison Field, Colorado -- 7.4. Incised-Valley-Fill Deposits and Reservoirs -- 7.4.1. Processes and Deposits -- 7.4.2. Reservoir Examples -- 7.4.2.1. Sorrento Field, Colorado -- 7.4.2.2. Regional Morrow Sandstone -- 7.5. Stratigraphy and Stacking Patterns of Fluvial Reservoirs -- 7.5.1. General -- 7.5.2. Examples -- 7.5.2.1. Glenn Pool Field, Oklahoma, United States -- 7.5.2.2. Cooper-Eromanga Basins, Australia -- 7.5.2.3. Northeast Betara Field (by I. Nyoman Suta and Budi Tyas Utomo), PetroChina International, Jakarta, Indonesia -- 7.5.2.3.1. History of Northeast Betara Field -- 7.5.2.3.2. Field Characteristics -- 7.5.2.3.3. Sedimentary Facies, Properties, and Distribution -- 7.5.2.3.3.1. Lower Braided-River Facies -- 7.5.2.3.3.2. Shale Interval -- 7.5.2.3.3.3. Upper Meandering-River Facies -- 7.5.2.3.4. Reservoir Compartments -- 7.5.2.3.5. Depositional Model -- 7.5.2.3.6. Sequence Stratigraphy -- 7.5.2.3.7. Field Development Plan -- 7.5.2.3.7.1. Field Development Scenario -- 7.5.2.3.7.2. Determination of Proposed Development Wells -- 7.5.2.3.8. Six Years Later -- 7.6. Summary -- References -- Chapter 8: Eolian (Windblown) Deposits and Reservoirs -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Processes and Deposits -- 8.3. Sandstone Reservoir Examples. , 8.3.1. Leman Sandstone Gas Reservoirs, North Sea -- 8.3.2. Rough Gas Field, North Sea -- 8.3.3. Pickerill Field, North Sea -- 8.3.4. Painter Reservoir Field, Wyoming -- 8.3.5. Tensleep Sandstone, Wyoming, USA -- 8.3.5.1. Location and Outcrop Characteristics -- 8.3.5.2. Outcrop 3D Geologic Model -- 8.3.5.3. Application to Tensleep Subsurface Reservoirs -- 8.4. Loess (Eolian Siltstone) Deposits and Reservoirs -- 8.4.1. Bravo Dome Field -- 8.4.2. Three Forks Formation -- 8.5. Summary -- References -- Chapter 9: Deltaic Deposits and Reservoirs -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. General Deltaic Processes, Environments (Physiographic Zones), and Types -- 9.3. Deltas Within a Sequence Stratigraphic Framework -- 9.4. River-Dominated Delta Deposits and Reservoirs -- 9.4.1. Processes and Deposits -- 9.4.2. Reservoir Example: Prudhoe Bay Field -- 9.4.3. Kuparuk River Field, Alaska USA -- 9.5. Wave-Dominated Deltas -- 9.5.1. Processes and Deposits -- 9.5.2. Reservoir Example: Budare Field -- 9.6. Tide-Dominated Deltas -- 9.6.1. Processes and Deposits -- 9.6.2. Reservoir Example: Lagunillas Field -- 9.7. Summary -- References -- Chapter 10: Nondeltaic, Shallow Marine Deposits and Reservoirs -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Shallow Marine Processes and Environments -- 10.3. Nondeltaic Shallow Marine Deposits Within a Sequence Stratigraphic Framework -- 10.4. Shoreline and Shallow Marine Deposits -- 10.4.1. Shelf, Shoreface, and/or Valley Fill Sandstones -- 10.4.2. Significance of the Origin of Deposits -- 10.5. Shoreface/Shallow Marine Reservoirs -- 10.5.1. Hartzog Draw Field -- 10.5.2. Terry Sandstone, Denver Basin, Colorado -- 10.5.3. Some Midcontinent Pennsylvanian Sandstones, Oklahoma, United States -- 10.5.4. Early Tertiary Shallow Marine Sandstones, Mexico -- 10.6. Barrier-Island Deposits and Reservoirs -- 10.6.1. Complex Processes and Deposits. , 10.6.2. Bell Creek and Recluse Fields, Montana and Wyoming, United States.
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  • 4
    Book
    Book
    New York : Springer
    Keywords: Atlas ; Tonmineral ; Ton ; Gesteinskunde ; Tonmineral ; Ton ; Gesteinskunde
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: XV, 141 S. , Ill., graph. Darst.
    ISBN: 0387973060 , 3540973060
    DDC: 552.5
    Language: English
    Note: Literaturverz. S. 133 - 137
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  • 5
    Keywords: Turbidites Congresses ; Turbidity currents Congresses ; Sediment transport Congresses ; Aufsatzsammlung ; Tiefseesediment ; Sedimenttransport ; Sedimentologie ; Fazies ; Kontinentalabhang ; Tiefsee ; Sedimentation ; Turbidit ; Mündungsgebiet ; Mündung ; Suspensionsströmung ; Schelf
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: VII, 214 S. , Ill., graph. Darst., Kt.
    ISBN: 9780891810681
    Series Statement: AAPG Studies in Geology 61
    Language: English
    Note: "Outgrowth of the 2008 AAPG Hedberg Conference titled 'Sediment Transfer from Shelf to Deep Water: Revisiting the Delivery Mechanisms' ... held in Argentina"--Page v , "Organized ... in Ushuaia, Argentina"--Page iv , Flood deposits in continental and marine environments : character and significance , A genetic facies tract for the analysis of sustained hyperpycnal flow deposits , Genetic indices in hyperpycnal systems : a case study in the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene merecure formation, Maturin Subbasin, Venezuela , Miocene deep-marine hyperpycnal channel levee complexes, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina : facies associations and architectural elements , Fluvial-derived turbidites in the Los Molles Formation (Jurassic of the Neuquén Basin) : initiation, transport, and deposition , Gravelly and sandy facies of Rio Gauche Formation, Venezuelan Andes : evidence for transformation of gravity flows in deep-marine water , The importance of sediment supply and sequence-stacking pattern in creating hyperpycnal flows , Ichnologic signatures of hyperpycnal flow deposits in Cretaceous river-dominated deltas, Austral Basin, southern Argentina , Ichnology and sedimentology of Miocene hyperpycnites of the Austral Foreland Basin (Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina) : trace fossil distribution and paleoecological implications , Evidence of shelfal hyperpycnal deposition of Pliocene sandstones in the Oilbird Field, southeast coast, Trinidad : impact on reservoir distribution
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Sedimentology 23 (1976), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-3091
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: A computer program is described for a Hewlett-Packard desk-top Calculator (Model 9820A)-Plotter (Model 9862A) which plots a histogram, frequency polygon and/or cumulative curve, as well as standard statistical parameters and percentages of gravel, sand, silt, and clay from raw weight data from a sediment grain-size analysis. The program utilizes the graphic method for calculating statistical parameters in contrast to other commonly used computer programs derived for the method of moments.This program is advantageous because (1) it is rapid, (2) it allows direct comparison with grain-size data in the literature which have been computed by the graphic method, (3) either a complete presentation of a distribution can be obtained on one sheet of paper or a series of cumulative curves or frequency polygons can be prepared on a single graph which is ready for publication photocopying, (4) automatic extrapolation of data points from a cumulative curve eliminates inconsistencies arising from manual extrapolation, and (5) the desk-top calculator is more convenient to use, eliminates punching of data cards, and can be operated by someone without a knowledge of computers and programming. Disadvantages of the program are: (1) some authors feel critical percentiles are more accurately read off cumulative curves plotted on a probability ordinate than on an arithmetic ordinate, (2) the cumulative curve is a series of straight-line segments, (3) the frequency polygon is not as accurate a representation of grain-size distribution as a frequency curve and (4) size class intervals for the histogram and frequency polygon are standardized at 0.5φ, even though gravel and mud fractions are analysed at whole φ intervals. For most studies, the advantages of the program outweigh the disadvantages.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Sedimentology 28 (1981), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-3091
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: The petrology of first cycle (unmodified) and second cycle (reworked) sand at the termini of eleven valley glaciers eroding coarse- to fine-grained bedrock types is determined in order to evaluate the origin and mechanical durability of lithic sands. First cycle sands are coarse- to medium-grained, poorly sorted, fine-skewed, non-modal lithic sands with an average composition of Q21F6L73. Grain-size distributions do not vary with composition or source rock types, although sands derived from finer grained source rocks contain more lithic fragments than sands from coarser grained sources. By contrast, second cycle sands are medium-grained, poorly sorted, fine- to coarse-skewed arkosic to lithic sands with an average composition of Q19F40L41, and contain fewer lithic fragments than do first cycle sands.We propose that the origin, mechanical durability and survival potential of lithic fragments are related to the types and abundances of their internal planes of weakness, and the particular stress field of the transporting medium. As a result of abrasion, glacial clasts and lithic fragments are subjected to shear stress so that fractures propagate along intracrystal and intercrystal planes of weakness resulting in a continuous grain-size spectrum of lithic fragments and monomineralic grains irrespective of the type of source rock. Upon subsequent aqueous transport in the proglacial environment lithic fragments are subjected to point-loading during saltation in addition to shear stress. Point-loading produces extensional fractures which preferentially propagate along intercrystal planes of weakness, so the lithic fragments break into smaller monomineralic grains and/or lithic fragments.Lithic fragments of very coarse sand-size are abundant in first cycle sands, thus refuting, at least for glacial sands, the widely held view that grains of this size are deficient in nature. The presence of fewer grains of this size in second cycle sands indicates that very coarse sand-size lithic fragments can survive recycling, but in greatly reduced proportions due to breakage.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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