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  • 1
    Keywords: Ocean circulation.. ; Ocean circulation -- Mathematical models.. ; Marine meteorology.. ; Marine meteorology -- Mathematical models. ; Electronic books.
    Description / Table of Contents: The book represents all the knowledge we currently have on ocean circulation. It presents an up-to-date summary of the state of the science relating to the role of the oceans in the physical climate system. The book is structured to guide the reader through the wide range of World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) science in a consistent way. Cross-references between contributors have been added, and the book has a comprehensive index and unified reference list. The book is simple to read, at the undergraduate level. It was written by the best scientists in the world who have collaborated to carry out years of experiments to better understand ocean circulation.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (737 pages)
    Edition: 1st ed.
    ISBN: 9780080491974
    Series Statement: Issn Ser. ; v.Volume 103
    DDC: 551.47
    Language: English
    Note: Cover -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Contributors -- Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgment -- Section 1: The Ocean and Climate -- Chapter 1.1. Climate and Oceans -- 1.1.1 WOCE and the World Climate Research Programme -- 1.1.2 The scientific approach to the complex climate system -- 1.1.3 Ocean-atmosphere interaction and climate -- 1.1.4 Rapid changes related to the oceans -- 1.1.5 Cryosphere and the oceans -- 1.1.6 Anthropogenic climate change and the oceans -- 1.1.7 Future climate research and ocean observing systems -- Chapter 1.2. Ocean Processes and Climate Phenomena -- 1.2.1 A global perspective -- 1.2.2 Air-sea fluxes -- 1.2.3 Ocean storage of heat and fresh water -- 1.2.4 Ocean circulation -- 1.2.5 Ocean transport of heat, fresh water and carbon -- 1.2.6 Climatic and oceanic variability -- 1.2.7 Impacts of ocean climate -- 1.2.8 Conclusion -- Chapter 1.3. The Origins, Development and Conduct of WOCE -- 1.3.1 Introduction -- 1.3.2 Large-scale oceanography in the 1960s and 1970s -- 1.3.3 Ocean research and climate -- 1.3.4 Implementation of WOCE (SSG initiatives) -- 1.3.5 Implementation and oversight -- 1.3.6 Was WOCE a success and what is its legacy? -- Section 2: Observations and Models -- Chapter 2.1. Global Problems and Global Observations -- 2.1.1 Different views of the ocean -- 2.1.2 The origins of WOCE -- 2.1.3 What do we know? -- 2.1.4 The need for global-scale observations -- 2.1.5 Where do we go from here? -- Chapter 2.2. High-Resolution Modelling of the Thermohaline and Wind-Driven Circulation -- 2.2.1 The improving realism of ocean models -- 2.2.2 Historical perspective -- 2.2.3 Basic model design considerations: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium solutions -- 2.2.4 Examples of model behaviour in different dynamical regimes -- 2.2.5 Concluding remarks -- Chapter 2.3. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models -- 2.3.1 Why coupled models?. , 2.3.2 Formulation of coupled models -- 2.3.3 Model drift and flux adjustment -- 2.3.4 Initialization of coupled models -- 2.3.5 Coupled model simulation of present and past climates -- 2.3.6 Coupled model simulation of future climates -- 2.3.7 Climate models, WOCE and future observations -- 2.3.8 Summary and future developments -- Section 3: New Ways of Observing the Ocean -- Chapter 3.1. Shipboard Observations during WOCE -- 3.1.1 The role of hydrographic measurements -- 3.1.2 CTD and sample measurements -- 3.1.3 Current measurements in the shipboard hydrographic programme -- 3.1.4 Shipboard meteorology -- 3.1.5 Summary and conclusions -- Chapter 3.2. Subsurface Lagrangian Observations during the 1990s -- 3.2.1 Determining currents in the ocean -- 3.2.2 Historical aspects: Stommel's -- 3.2.3 The WOCE Float Programme -- 3.2.4 WOCE float observations -- 3.2.5 The future -- Chapter 3.3. Ocean Circulation and Variability from Satellite Altimetry -- 3.3.1 Altimeter observations -- 3.3.2 The ocean general circulation -- 3.3.3 Large-scale sea-level variability -- 3.3.4 Currents and eddies -- 3.3.5 Concluding discussions -- Chapter 3.4. Air-Sea Fluxes from Satellite Data -- 3.4.1 Forcing the ocean -- 3.4.2 Bulk parameterization -- 3.4.3 Wind forcing -- 3.4.4 Thermal forcing -- 3.4.5 Hydrologic forcing -- 3.4.6 Future prospects -- Chapter 3.5. Developing the WOCE Global Data System -- 3.5.1 Organization and planning for WOCE data systems -- 3.5.2 Elements of the WOCE Data System -- 3.5.3 The WOCE Global Data Set and future developments -- Section 4: The Global Flow Field -- Chapter 4.1. The World Ocean Surface Circulation -- 4.1.1 Background -- 4.1.2 Methodology -- 4.1.3 The global mean velocity and velocity variance -- 4.1.4 The wind-driven Ekman currents -- 4.1.5 Future global circulation observations -- Chapter 4.2. The Interior Circulation of the Ocean. , 4.2.1 Processes in the ocean interior -- 4.2.2 Observational evidence -- 4.2.3 Theory of gyre-scale circulation -- 4.2.4 The abyssal circulation -- 4.2.5 Conclusions -- Chapter 4.3. The Tropical Ocean Circulation -- 4.3.1 Flow and water mass transformation patterns -- 4.3.2 Equatorial phenomena in the Pacific Ocean -- 4.3.3 Equatorial Atlantic -- 4.3.4 Near-equatorial circulation in the Indian Ocean -- 4.3.5 Overall conclusions -- Chapter 4.4. Tropical-Extratropical Oceanic Exchange Pathways -- 4.4.1 The role of diffusion and advection -- 4.4.2 Tropical-subtropical exchanges of thermocline waters -- 4.4.3 Tropical-subpolar exchange of Intermediate Waters -- 4.4.4 Summary and further issues -- Chapter 4.5. Quantification of the Deep Circulation -- 4.5.1 Deep circulation in the framework of WOCE -- 4.5.2 Deep Western Boundary Currents -- 4.5.3 The interior: The Deep Basin Experiment -- 4.5.4 Summary -- Chapter 4.6. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current System -- 4.6.1 Flow in the zonally unbounded ocean -- 4.6.2 Observations of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current -- 4.6.3 Dynamics of the ACC -- 4.6.4 Water mass formation and conversion -- 4.6.5 The Southern Ocean and the global overturning circulations -- 4.6.6 Conclusions -- Chapter 4.7. Interocean Exchange -- 4.7.1 Interocean links -- 4.7.2 Bering Strait -- 4.7.3 Indonesian Seas -- 4.7.4 The Agulhas Retroflection -- 4.7.5 Discussion -- Section 5: Formation and Transport of Water Masses -- Chapter 5.1. Ocean Surface Water Mass Transformation -- 5.1.1 The problem -- 5.1.2 Theory of surface water mass transformation -- 5.1.3 Ocean surface temperature, salinity and density -- 5.1.4 Surface fluxes of heat, fresh water and density -- 5.1.5 Surface water mass transformation and formation -- 5.1.6 Summary -- Chapter 5.2. Mixing and Stirring in the Ocean Interior -- 5.2.1 Scales of mixing and stirring. , 5.2.2 Background -- 5.2.3 The Temporal-Residual-Mean circulation -- 5.2.4 Lateral dispersion between the mesoscale and the microscale -- 5.2.5 Diapycnal mixing in and above the main thermocline -- 5.2.6 Mixing in the abyss -- 5.2.7 Discussion -- Chapter 5.3. Subduction -- 5.3.1 A little of the background on oceanic subduction -- 5.3.2 Surface-layer dynamics and thermodynamics of the subduction process -- 5.3.3 Development of steady, continuous models: Application to numerical model analysis and observations -- 5.3.4 Transient response of the thermocline to decadal variability -- 5.3.5 Summary and outlook -- Chapter 5.4. Mode Waters -- 5.4.1 Ventilation and mode water generation -- 5.4.2 Definition, detection and general characteristics of mode waters -- 5.4.3 Geographical distribution of mixed-layer depth and mode waters in the world's oceans -- 5.4.4 Temporal variability of mode water properties and distribution -- 5.4.5 Summary -- Chapter 5.5. Deep Convection -- 5.5.1 Convection and spreading -- 5.5.2 Plumes - the mixing agent -- 5.5.3 Temperature and salinity variability -- 5.5.4 Restratification -- 5.5.5 Summary and discussion -- Chapter 5.6. The Dense Northern Overflows -- 5.6.1 The sources -- 5.6.2 Overflow paths -- 5.6.3 Observed transport means and variability -- 5.6.4 Processes in the overflows -- 5.6.5 Analytical models of the overflow -- 5.6.6 Numerical models of the overflow -- 5.6.7 Overflow variability -- 5.6.8 What have we learnt in WOCE? -- Chapter 5.7. Mediterranean Water and Global Circulation -- 5.7.1 Marginal seas -- 5.7.2 Formation of Mediterranean Water -- 5.7.3 Outflow of Mediterranean Water at the Strait of Gibraltar -- 5.7.4 The effect of Mediterranean Water outflow on the circulation of the North Atlantic and the World Oceans -- Chapter 5.8. Transformation and Age of Water Masses -- 5.8.1 Background. , 5.8.2 Tracer methodology and techniques -- 5.8.3 Exemplary results -- 5.8.4 Outlook -- Section 6: Large-Scale Ocean Transports -- Chapter 6.1. Ocean Heat Transport -- 6.1.1 The global heat balance -- 6.1.2 Bulk formula estimates of ocean heat transport -- 6.1.3 Residual method estimates of ocean heat transport -- 6.1.4 Direct estimates of ocean heat transport -- 6.1.5 Discussion -- 6.1.6 Challenges -- 6.1.7 Summary -- 6.1.8 Outlook for direct estimates of ocean heat transport -- Chapter 6.2. Ocean Transport of Fresh Water -- 6.2.1 The importance of freshwater transport -- 6.2.2 Indirect estimates of oceanic freshwater transport -- 6.2.3 Impacts of uncertainties on model development -- 6.2.4 Direct ocean estimates of freshwater transport -- 6.2.5 Comparison of direct and indirect flux estimates -- 6.2.6 Mechanisms of oceanic freshwater transport -- 6.2.7 Global budgets -- 6.2.8 Summary -- Chapter 6.3. Storage and Transport of Excess CO2 in the Oceans: The JGOFS/WOCE Global CO2 Survey -- 6.3.1 Introduction -- 6.3.2 Background -- 6.3.3 The JGOFS/WOCE Global CO2 Survey -- 6.3.4 Synthesis of Global CO2 Survey data: Review -- 6.3.5 Conclusions and outlook -- Section 7: Insights for the Future -- Chapter 7.1. Towards a WOCE Synthesis -- 7.1.1 Exploiting the WOCE data set -- 7.1.2 Data-based analyses -- 7.1.3 Model evaluation and development -- 7.1.4 Ocean state estimation -- 7.1.5 Summary and outlook -- Chapter 7.2. Numerical Ocean Circulation Modelling: Present Status and Future Directions -- 7.2.1 Remarks on the history of ocean modelling -- 7.2.2 Space-time scales of ocean processes and models -- 7.2.3 Modelling issues -- 7.2.4 Atmospheric forcing and coupling -- 7.2.5 Organization of model development -- 7.2.6 Concluding remarks -- Chapter 7.3. The World during WOCE -- 7.3.1 Assessing the representativeness of the WOCE data set. , 7.3.2 The state of the atmosphere during WOCE.
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  • 2
    Keywords: World Ocean Circulation Experiment. ; Electronic books.
    Description / Table of Contents: The book represents all the knowledge we currently have on ocean circulation. It presents an up-to-date summary of the state of the science relating to the role of the oceans in the physical climate system. The book is structured to guide the reader through the wide range of world ocean circulation experiment (WOCE) science in a consistent way. Cross-references between contributors have been added, and the book has a comprehensive index and unified reference list. The book is simple to read, at the undergraduate level. It was written by the best scientists in the world who have collaborated to carry out years of experiments to better understand ocean circulation. Presents in situ and remote observations with worldwide coverage Provides theoretical understanding of processes within the ocean and at its boundaries to other Earth System components Allows for simulating ocean and climate processes in the past, present and future using a hierarchy of physical-biogeochemical models.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (893 pages)
    Edition: 2nd ed.
    ISBN: 9780123918536
    Series Statement: Issn Ser. ; v.Volume 103
    DDC: 551.46/2
    Language: English
    Note: Front Cover -- Ocean Circulation and Climate: A 21st Century Perspective -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Cover Graphics -- Preface -- Part I: The Ocean's Role in the Climate System -- Chapter 1: The Ocean as a Component of the Climate System -- 1. Setting the Scene -- 2. The Ocean as an Exchanging Earth System Reservoir -- 3. Atmosphere-Ocean Fluxes and Meridional Transports -- 4. Global-Scale Surface and Deep Ocean Circulations -- 5. Large-Scale Modes of Variability Involving the Ocean -- 6. The Ocean's Role in Past Climate Change -- 7. The Ocean in the Anthropocene -- 8. Concluding Thoughts -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 2: Paleoclimatic Ocean Circulation and Sea-Level Changes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Reconstructing Past Ocean States -- 2.1. Proxies for Past Ocean Circulation -- 2.1.1. Nutrient Water Mass Tracers -- 2.1.2. Conservative Water Mass Tracers -- 2.1.3. Circulation Rate Tracers -- 2.1.4. Other Tracers -- 2.2. Past Sea-Level Proxies -- 2.2.1. Coastal Morphology and Corals -- 2.2.2. Sediment Cores -- 2.2.3. Manmade Sea-Level Indicators -- 2.3. Models -- 3. The Oceans in the Quaternary -- 3.1. The Last Glacial Maximum -- 3.2. Abrupt Glacial Climate Changes -- 3.2.1. Deglaciation -- 3.3. Glacial Cycles -- 3.4. Interglacial Climates -- 4. The Deeper Past -- 4.1. Challenges of Deep-Time Paleoceanography -- 4.2. The Oceans During the Mid-Cretaceous Warm Period -- 5. Outlook -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part II: Ocean Observations -- Chapter 3: In Situ Ocean Observations: A Brief History, Present Status, and Future Directions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Development of Present Observational Capability -- 2.1. Late Nineteenth to Mid-Twentieth Centuries -- 2.2. Second Half of Twentieth Century -- 2.3. Twenty-First Century: Consolidation of Capabilities and Growth of Sustained Observations. , 3. Emerging and Specialized Ocean Observing Technologies -- 3.1. Advanced Observing Platforms -- 3.2. Specialized Observing Systems and Technologies -- 3.3. New Sensors -- 4. Changes in Data Volume and Coverage and Implication for Synthesis Products -- 5. The Future: Outstanding Issues and a New Framework for Global Ocean Observing -- 5.1. Building on OceanObs'09 -- 6. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 4: Remote Sensing of the Global Ocean Circulation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Ocean General Circulation -- 3. Variability of the Large-Scale Ocean Circulation -- 3.1. Sea Surface Height -- 3.2. Ocean Mass and Bottom Pressure -- 3.3. Global Mean Sea-Level Change (see also Chapter 27) -- 3.4. Forcing by the Atmosphere and Air-Sea Interaction -- 4. Mesoscale Eddies and Fronts -- 4.1. Mapping the Eddy Field -- 4.2. Wave Number Spectra and the Ocean Energy Cascade -- 4.3. Seasonal and Interannual Variations in Eddy Energy -- 4.4. Tracking Individual Eddies -- 4.5. Surface Currents from Multisensor Mapping -- 4.6. Eddy Fluxes of Ocean Properties (see also Chapter 8) -- 4.7. Submesoscale Dynamics -- 4.8. Eddies and Biogeochemical Processes -- 5. Summary and Outlook -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part III: Ocean Processes -- Chapter 5: Exchanges Through the Ocean Surface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Air-Sea Exchange Formulae and Climatological Fields -- 2.1. Air-Sea Exchange Formulae -- 2.2. Climatological Fields -- 3. Measurement Techniques and Review of Datasets -- 3.1. Flux Measurement and Estimation Techniques -- 3.1.1. Advances in Parameterizations and In Situ Flux Measurements -- 3.1.2. High Quality In Situ Surface Flux Datasets -- 3.2. Flux Datasets: Overview of Recent Products -- 3.2.1. Atmospheric Reanalyses -- 3.2.2. Satellite Observations -- 3.2.3. In Situ Observations -- 3.2.4. Blended Products -- 3.3. Flux Datasets: Evaluation Techniques. , 4. Variability and Extremes -- 4.1. Impacts of Large-Scale Modes of Variability on Surface Fluxes -- 4.2. Surface Flux Response to Anthropogenic Climate Change -- 4.3. Transfers Under Extreme Conditions -- 5. Ocean Impacts -- 5.1. Impacts on Near-Surface Ocean Layer Properties, Water Mass Transformation -- 5.2. Impacts of Surface Fluxes on Ocean Circulation -- 6. Outlook and Conclusions -- 6.1. Prospects for Improved Flux Datasets -- 6.2. Prospects for Enhanced Observational Constraints -- 6.3. Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 6: Thermodynamics of Seawater -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Absolute Salinity SA and Preformed Salinity S* -- 2.1. Reference-Composition Salinity SR -- 2.2. Absolute Salinity SA -- 2.3. Preformed Salinity S* -- 3. The Gibbs-Function Approach to Evaluating Thermodynamic Properties -- 4. The First Law of Thermodynamics and Conservative Temperature Θ -- 5. The 48-Term Expression for Specific Volume -- 6. Changes to Oceanographic Practice Under TEOS-10 -- 7. Ocean Modeling Using TEOS-10 -- 8. Summary -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 7: Diapycnal Mixing Processes in the Ocean Interior -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Mixing Basics -- 3. Turbulence in and Below the Surface Mixed Layer -- 3.1. Langmuir Turbulence -- 3.2. Inertial Motions -- 3.3. An Equatorial Example -- 3.4. Fronts and Other Lateral Processes -- 4. Mixing in the Ocean Interior -- 4.1. Internal Wave Breaking -- 4.1.1. Dissipation Near Internal Tide Generation Sites -- 4.1.2. Dissipation Near-Inertial Wave Generation Sites -- 4.1.3. Wave-Wave Interactions -- 4.1.4. Distant Graveyards -- 4.2. Mixing in Fracture Zones -- 4.3. Mesoscale Dissipation as a Source of Turbulent Mixing -- 4.4. In-Depth Example: Southern Ocean Mixing (see also Chapter 18) -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1. Finescale Parameterizations of Turbulent Mixing. , 5.2. Global Values and Patterns -- 5.3. Representing Patchy Mixing in Large-Scale Models: Progress and Consequences -- 6. Summary and Future Directions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 8: Lateral Transport in the Ocean Interior -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theory of Mass, Tracer, and Vector Transport -- 2.1. Fundamental Equations -- 2.1.1. Primitive Equations -- 2.1.2. Minimal-Disturbance Planes and Slopes -- 2.1.3. Density-Coordinate Continuity and Tracer Equations -- 2.2. Steady, Conservative Equations -- 2.3. Reynolds-Averaged Equations -- 2.4. Diffusion by Continuous Movements -- 2.4.1. Diagnosing Eigenvectors, Eigenvalues, and Principal Axes of Diffusivities -- 2.5. Sources of Anisotropy in Oceanic Diffusion -- 2.6. The Veronis Effect -- 2.7. Streamfunction and Diffusivity -- 3. Observations and Models of Spatial Variations of Eddy Statistics -- 4. Mesoscale Isoneutral Diffusivity Variation Parameterizations -- 4.1. Parameterizations Versus Diagnosed K -- 4.1.1. Eddy Scales Versus Instability Scale -- 4.1.2. Eddy Versus Instability Spatial Scale -- 4.1.3. Eddy Versus Instability Time Scale -- 4.2. New Parameterization Approaches and Future Developments -- 5. Conclusions and Remaining Questions -- Acknowledgment -- References -- Chapter 9: Global Distribution and Formation of Mode Waters -- 1. Mode Water Observations -- 2. Global Water Mass Census of the Upper Ocean -- 3. Global Distribution of Mode Water -- 4. Formation of Mode Water -- 5. PV Framework -- 6. Mode Water and Climate -- 7. Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 10: Deepwater Formation -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Circulation and Distribution of NADW and AABW -- 1.2. Observed Heat Content Changes in AABW -- 1.3. Observed Heat Content Changes in Upper and Lower NADW -- 2. Processes of Deepwater Formation. , 2.1. Deep Convection: The Example of Formation of Upper North Atlantic Deep Water -- 2.2. Entrainment: The Example of the Formation of the Lower North Atlantic Deep Water -- 2.3. Shelf and Under-Ice Processes: The Example of Formation of AABW -- 2.3.1. Formation Rates and Spreading of AABW -- 3. Interannual and Decadal Variability in Properties, Formation Rate, and Circulation -- 3.1. Labrador Sea Water: Variability in Properties and Formation Rate -- 3.2. Greenland-Scotland Ridge Overflow Water: Variability in Properties and Overflow Rate -- 3.3. Relationship Between Formation Rates of NADW and Changes in the AMOC -- 3.4. Antarctic Bottom Water: Variability in Properties and Formation Rate -- 4. Conclusions and Outlook -- References -- Part IV: Ocean Circulation and Water Masses -- Chapter 11: Conceptual Models of the Wind-Driven and Thermohaline Circulation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Wind-Driven Circulation -- 2.1. Ekman Layer and Ekman Overturning Cells -- 2.2. Sverdrup Balance -- 2.3. Western Boundary Currents and Inertial Recirculation -- 2.4. Vertical Structure of the Wind-Driven Circulation -- 2.5. Role of Bottom Topography -- 3. Thermohaline Circulation -- 3.1. Energetics and Global Perspective -- 3.2. Role of the Southern Ocean and Relation to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current -- 3.3. Water Mass Formation -- 3.4. Three-Dimensional Structure of the THC -- 3.5. Feedbacks and Multiple Equilibria -- 3.6. Does the South Atlantic Determine the Stability of the THC? -- 4. Transient Behaviour of the Wind-Driven and Thermohaline Circulation -- 5. Discussion and Perspective -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 12: Ocean Surface Circulation -- 1. Observed Near-Surface Currents -- 1.1. Global Drifter Program and History of Lagrangian Observations -- 1.2. Mean Surface Circulation -- 2. Geostrophic Surface Circulation. , 2.1. High-Resolution Mean Dynamic Topography.
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  • 3
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: 35 S. , graph. Darst.
    Series Statement: Berichte aus dem Institut für Meereskunde an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 181
    Language: German
    Note: Literaturverz. S. 35
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  • 4
    Book
    Book
    Kiel : Inst. für Meereskunde, Abt. Meeresphysik
    Description / Table of Contents: Die Zusammenstellung zu den SI-Einheiten soll eine praktische Arbeitsgrundlage für die Verwendung dieser Einheiten in der Ozeanographie bereitstellen. Sie paßt die grundlegenden Vorschriften des SI-Systems (Système International d'Unités) und die vom UNESCO/ICES/SCOR/IAPSO-Ausschuß "Ozeanographische Tabelle und Standards" (JPOTS) erarbeiteten Regeln für die Anwendung in der Ozeanographie zusammen. Grundlagen sind der SUN Report (IAPSO, 1979), die IAPSO-Publication Scientifique No. 32, veröffentlicht bei der UNESCO (1985) und die Empfehlungen der genannten internationalen Meeresforschungsorganisationen zum "Praktischen Salzgehalt" und zur neuen Zustandsgleichung des Meerwassers (UNESCO, 1981, 1983). Außerdem werden Angaben zur neuen internationalen Temperaturskala gegeben (SAUNDERS, 1990). Der Bericht enthält ferner eine Zusammenfassung von Größen und Einheiten zur Strahlungsenergieübertragung im Meer. Die 3. Auflage wurde gegenüber der 2. Auflage vor allem durch Erläuterungen zu oft gebrauchten Bezeichnungen ergänzt. Bei den Strahlungsgrößen wurden einige Bezeichnungen entsprechend dem überwiegend üblichen Gebrauch verändert bzw. hinzugefügt, und einige Fehler wurden korrigiert.
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: 30 Bl , graph. Darst , 30 cm
    Series Statement: Berichte aus dem Institut für Meereskunde an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 101
    Language: German
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  • 5
    Keywords: Meeresströmung ; Atlantischer Ozean ; Aufsatzsammlung ; Konferenzschrift ; Atlantischer Ozean Süd ; Meeresströmung
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: IX, 644 S , Ill., zahlr. graph. Darst., Kt
    ISBN: 3540620796
    DDC: 551.464
    Language: English
    Note: Literaturangaben , Literaturangaben
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  • 6
    Keywords: Hochschulschrift
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: 73 Bl , graph. Darst
    Language: English
    Note: Kiel, Univ., Diplomarbeit, 1999
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  • 7
    Keywords: Hochschulschrift
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: Online-Ressource (72 Seiten, 3,2 MB) , Diagramme
    Series Statement: Berichte aus dem Institut für Meereskunde an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 84
    Language: German
    Note: Zusammenfassung in deutscher und englischer Sprache
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  • 8
    Keywords: Hochschulschrift
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: Online-Ressource (120 Seiten, 4 MB) , Diagramme
    Series Statement: Berichte aus dem Institut für Meereskunde an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 105
    Language: German
    Note: Zusammenfassung in deutscher und englischer Sprache
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  • 9
    Keywords: Hochschulschrift
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: Online-Ressource (109 Seiten, 4 MB) , Diagramme
    Series Statement: Berichte aus dem Institut für Meereskunde an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 107
    Language: German
    Note: Zusammenfassung in deutscher und englischer Sprache
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  • 10
    Keywords: Hochschulschrift
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: Online-Ressource (102 Seiten, 2,7 MB) , Diagramme
    Series Statement: Berichte aus dem Institut für Meereskunde an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 129
    Language: German
    Note: Zusammenfassung in deutscher und englischer Sprache
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