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  • 1
    Keywords: Water-Pollution-Europe, Eastern-Congresses. ; Electronic books.
    Description / Table of Contents: Proceeedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop "Identification and Selection of Technologies for Use at Former Soviet Military Installations in Central and Eastern Europe", conducted in Visegrad, Hungary, June 21-23, 1994.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (253 pages)
    Edition: 1st ed.
    ISBN: 9783642578038
    Series Statement: Nato Science Partnership Subseries: 2 Series ; v.1
    DDC: 363.73/84
    Language: English
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  • 2
    Keywords: Cardiovascular system--Computer simulation. ; Cardiovascular system--Diseases--Diagnosis. ; Models, Cardiovascular. ; Cardiovascular Diseases--diagnosis. ; Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena. ; Computer Simulation. ; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted--methods. ; Patient-Centered Care--methods. ; Electronic books.
    Description / Table of Contents: This book demonstrates the design of a variety of patient-specific models within the cardiovascular system in computational biology, which have the potential to predict or optimize outcomes of clinical treatments.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (252 pages)
    Edition: 1st ed.
    ISBN: 9781441966919
    DDC: 616.100285
    Language: English
    Note: Intro -- Patient Specific Modelingof the Cardiovascular System -- Foreword -- Preface -- References -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter 1: Integrating State-of-the-Art Computational Modeling with Clinical Practice: The Promise of Numerical Methods -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Imaging Methods Used in Patient-Specific Modeling -- 1.2.1 Echocardiography -- 1.2.2 Computed Tomography -- 1.2.3 Nuclear Imaging -- 1.2.4 Magnetic Resonance Imaging -- 1.2.5 Use of Imaging Data -- 1.3 Current Use of Patient-Specific Models in Cardiac Electrophysiology -- 1.3.1 Overview of Modeling During Invasive Electrophysiology Study and Ablation -- 1.3.2 Current Application of Computer Modeling in Atrial Arrhythmias -- 1.3.2.1 Atrial Fibrillation -- 1.3.2.2 Atypical Atrial Flutter and Focal Atrial Tachycardia -- 1.3.3 Current Application of Computer Modeling in Ventricular Arrhythmias -- 1.3.3.1 Premature Ventricular Contractions and Ventricular Tachycardia -- 1.3.3.2 Ventricular Fibrillation -- 1.3.4 Application in Remote Catheter Manipulation -- 1.3.5 Application in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy -- 1.3.6 Application in Sudden Cardiac Death -- 1.4 Future Applications of Computer Modeling in Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology -- 1.4.1 Atrial Arrhythmias -- 1.4.2 Ventricular Arrhythmias -- 1.4.3 Resynchronization Therapy and Congestive Heart Failure -- 1.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2: Patient-Specific Modeling of Cardiovascular Dynamics with a Major Role for Adaptation -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Cardiovascular Forward Models -- 2.3 Integration to a Comprehensive Circulatory System -- 2.4 Adaptation Rules -- 2.5 Examples of Patient-Specific Modeling -- 2.5.1 Reference State -- 2.5.2 Non-invasively Obtained LV Pump Function and Myofiber Function -- 2.5.3 Complete Pressure-Volume Loop of the Left Ventricle. , 2.5.4 Delay of the LV Activation in Left Bundle Branch Block -- 2.6 Discussion -- References -- Chapter 3: Patient-Specific Modeling of Structure and Function of Cardiac Cells -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Cardiac Cells -- 3.3 Cardiovascular Diseases and Cellular Phenotype -- 3.4 Imaging of Cardiac Cells -- 3.5 Modeling of Cardiac Cells -- 3.5.1 Functional Modeling -- 3.5.1.1 Development and Implementation of Functional Models -- 3.5.1.2 Models of Cardiac Cells -- 3.5.2 Structural Modeling -- 3.5.2.1 Development of Structural Models -- 3.5.2.2 Image Processing -- 3.5.2.3 Model Representation -- 3.6 Clinical Perspective -- References -- Chapter 4: Studies of Therapeutic Strategies for Atrial Fibrillation Based on a Biophysical Model of the Human Atria -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Computer Modeling of AF -- 4.2.1 Biophysical Model of Human Atria -- 4.2.1.1 Atrial Geometry -- 4.2.1.2 Electrical Propagation in Atrial Tissue -- 4.2.1.3 Atrial Cellular Model -- 4.2.2 Modeling Different Types of AF -- 4.2.2.1 Multiple Wavelet AF -- 4.2.2.2 Meandering Wavelet AF -- 4.2.2.3 Heterogeneities -- 4.2.2.4 Focal AF -- 4.2.3 Link to Clinical Data -- 4.3 Therapeutic Strategies for AF -- 4.3.1 Modeling AF Therapies -- 4.3.1.1 AF Database -- 4.4 Spontaneous Termination of AF -- 4.4.1 Simulation of Spontaneously Terminated Episodes -- 4.4.2 Temporal Scales of Termination -- 4.4.3 Spatial Scales of Termination -- 4.5 Ablation of AF -- 4.6 Pacing of AF -- 4.6.1 Pacing Protocol and Assessment of AF Capture -- 4.6.2 AF Pacing Results -- 4.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 5: Patient-Specific Modeling for Critical Care -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Examples of Patient-Specific Modeling in Critical Care -- 5.2.1 Hemodynamic Models -- 5.2.1.1 Cardiac Output Estimation -- 5.2.1.2 Simulating Response to Traumatic Brain Injury -- 5.2.2 Models of Glucose and Insulin Dynamics. , 5.2.2.1 Controlling Blood Glucose Levels -- 5.3 Current Challenges -- 5.3.1 Clinical Validation -- 5.3.2 Timely Tuning Methods -- 5.3.3 Variability in Patient Anatomy, Physiology and Clinical Scenario -- 5.3.4 Model Interoperability -- 5.4 Vision for the Future -- References -- Chapter 6: Biomechanical Analysis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms -- 6.1 Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm -- 6.2 AAA Risk Stratification -- 6.3 AAA Biomechanical Analysis -- 6.3.1 Wall Stress Reproducibility -- 6.3.2 Initial Stress -- 6.3.3 Intraluminal Thrombus -- 6.3.4 Material Properties -- 6.3.5 Future Directions -- 6.4 Clinical Application -- 6.5 Scope and Limitations -- 6.6 Clinical Perspectives -- 6.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: The Cardiac Atlas Project: Towards a Map of the Heart -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging -- 7.3 Mapping Shape and Motion -- 7.4 Population Models -- 7.4.1 Parametric Distribution Models -- 7.4.2 Clinical Functional Modes -- 7.5 Data Fusion -- 7.6 The CAP Databases -- 7.6.1 Production Database (CCB) -- 7.6.2 Research Database -- 7.7 The CAP Client -- 7.8 CAP Data Access -- 7.8.1 Upload and Deidentification -- 7.8.2 Ownership and Control of Data Use -- 7.8.3 Protocols for Users -- 7.8.4 Informed Consent and Institutional Review Board Approval -- 7.9 Conclusions and Future Work -- 7.9.1 Grid Enabling -- 7.9.2 Ontologies -- References -- Chapter 8: In Vivo Myocardial Material Properties and Stress Distributions in Normal and Failing Human Hearts -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Left Ventricular Diastolic Function -- 8.2.1 Methodology for Model Generation and Strain Calculation in the Left Ventricle -- 8.2.2 Left Ventricular Myofiber Stress Distributions in a Normal Human Subject and a Patient with Diastolic Heart Failure -- 8.3 A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility. , References -- Chapter 9: Modeling of Whole-Heart Electrophysiology and Mechanics: Toward Patient-Specific Simulations -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Image Segmentation -- 9.2.1 Suspension Medium Removal -- 9.2.2 Level Set Segmentation -- 9.2.3 Segmentation of Ventricles -- 9.2.4 Infarct Segmentation -- 9.3 Electrical Mesh Generation -- 9.4 Mechanical Mesh Generation -- 9.5 Modeling of Electrophysiology: General Aspects -- 9.6 Modeling of Electromechanics: General Aspects -- 9.7 Cardiac Electrophysiology Modeling Example: Ventricular Tachycardia in the Infarcted Canine Heart -- 9.8 Cardiac Electromechanics Modeling Example: Electromechanical Delay in the Normal Canine Heart -- 9.9 On the Road to Patient-Specific Modeling -- 9.9.1 Processing Pipeline for Estimating Patient-Specific Fiber Orientations -- 9.9.2 Reconstruction of Patient Heart Geometry -- 9.9.3 Deformation of Atlas Heart Geometry -- 9.9.4 Deformation of Atlas Fiber Orientations -- 9.9.5 Pipeline Validation -- 9.10 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 10: Personalized Computational Models of the Heart for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Clinical Context, Data Acquisition, and Fusion -- 10.3 Personalized Anatomy -- 10.4 Personalized Electrophysiology -- 10.5 Personalized Electromechanical Models -- 10.5.1 Personalized Kinematics -- 10.5.2 Personalized Mechanics -- 10.6 Prediction of the Acute Effects of Pacing on Left Ventricular Pressure -- 10.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11: Patient-Specific Modeling of Hypoxic Response and Microvasculature Dynamics -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Hypoxic Response in Disease -- 11.3 Hypoxic Response and Oxygen Sensing Models -- 11.3.1 Blood Flow and Oxygen Transport -- 11.3.2 NO and Vasodilation -- 11.3.3 Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1: The Hypoxia Transcription Factor. , 11.3.3.1 Therapeutic Modulation of Cofactors in the HIF1 Pathway -- 11.3.3.2 Effects of Chronic Hypoxia at the Molecular Level -- 11.3.3.3 Reactive Oxygen Species Effect in the Hypoxic Response Signaling Pathway -- 11.3.3.4 HIF1 Intracellular Signaling Leading to VEGF Expression Changes -- 11.3.4 Cell-Level and Integrated, Multiscale Angiogenesis Models -- 11.4 Modeling Individual Variability -- 11.5 Discussion and Conclusions: Integrating and Validating Inter- and Intra-patient Variation on Multiple Scales -- References -- Chapter 12: A Computational Framework for Patient-Specific Multi-Scale Cardiac Modeling -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Multi-Scale Framework of Cardiac Modeling -- 12.3 Input Data Pipeline for Patient-Specific Multi-Scale Cardiac Modeling -- 12.3.1 Ventricular Anatomy and Fiber Architecture -- 12.3.2 Hemodynamics -- 12.3.3 Electrophysiology -- 12.4 Software Architecture -- 12.5 Database Server -- 12.6 Solver Client -- 12.7 Model Editors -- 12.8 Solver Server -- 12.9 Imaging and Fitting Modules -- 12.10 Mesh Module -- 12.11 Biomechanics -- 12.12 Electrophysiology Module -- 12.13 Fully Coupled Electromechanics Models -- 12.14 Plug-in Applications -- 12.15 Computational Requirements -- 12.16 Limitations -- References -- Appendix: Mathematical Modeling Language Code for the Hemodynamic Model in Fig. 5.1b -- Biography -- Index.
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  • 3
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    London :Current Medicine Group LLC,
    Keywords: Esophagus-Diseases-Atlases. ; Electronic books.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (250 pages)
    Edition: 2nd ed.
    ISBN: 9781461310938
    DDC: 612.3/1
    Language: English
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  • 4
    Book
    Book
    London [u.a.] : Allen & Unwin
    Keywords: Sedimentologie
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: XVIII, 276 S , Ill., graph. Darst
    ISBN: 0045511314 , 0045511322
    DDC: 551.3'04
    RVK:
    RVK:
    Language: English
    Note: Literaturverz. S. 260 - 269
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  • 5
    Book
    Book
    London [u.a.] : McGraw-Hill
    Keywords: Hydrology ; Lehrbuch ; Hydrologie ; Hydrogeologie ; Hydrologie
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: XVI, 367 S , Ill , 23 cm
    Edition: 2. ed.
    ISBN: 0070840563 , 0070840555
    DDC: 551.4
    RVK:
    Language: English
    Note: Includes bibliographies and index
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  • 6
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    In:  http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/9075 | 115 | 2012-11-26 08:21:02 | 9075 | WorldFish Center
    Publication Date: 2021-07-01
    Description: A brief description of the NMFS/ORSTOM/ILCARM climate and Eastern Ocean systems (CEOS) project is given. CEOS will study the four major eastern boundary current regions (Peru/Chile, California, Northwest and Southwest Africa) and attempt to separate local short term changes of their resources and/or dynamics from long-term, climatic global changes. Expected products range from a large, widely accessible oceanographic / atmospheric database to various documents that will present key results as well as improved contacts and stronger analytical capabilities in cooperating national institutions.
    Keywords: Fisheries ; Oceanography ; Climatic changes ; Research ; Ecosystems ; Clupeoid fisheries ; Upwelling
    Repository Name: AquaDocs
    Type: article
    Format: application/pdf
    Format: application/pdf
    Format: 26-30
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    s.l. : American Chemical Society
    Analytical chemistry 61 (1989), S. 1435-1441 
    ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [S.l.] : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Journal of Applied Physics 86 (1999), S. 3792-3796 
    ISSN: 1089-7550
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Based on semiempirical quantum-chemical calculations, the electronic band structure of β-Ga2O3 is presented and the formation and properties of oxygen vacancies are analyzed. The equilibrium geometries and formation energies of neutral and doubly ionized vacancies were calculated. Using the calculated donor level positions of the vacancies, the high temperature n-type conduction is explained. The vacancy concentration is obtained by fitting to the experimental resistivity and electron mobility. © 1999 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1471-4159
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: In vertebrate neuromuscular junctions, post-synaptic specialization includes aggregation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The motor nerve provides soluble factors and electrical activity to achieve this striking localization of AChRs/AChE. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide synthesized by motor neurons, is able to stimulate the expression of AChR in cultured myotubes. Similar to AChR regulation, synthesis of AChE in cultured chick myotubes is also stimulated by CGRP. Application of CGRP onto cultured myotubes stimulated the accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) as well as the expression of AChE mRNA and protein. However, the enzymatic activity of AChE remained unchanged. In cultured myotubes, various drugs affecting the intracellular level of cAMP, such as N6,O2′-dibutyryladenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate, cholera toxin, and forskolin, could mimic the effect of CGRP in stimulating the expression of AChE. When myotubes were transfected with cDNA encoding constitutively active mutant Gαs, the intracellular cAMP synthesis was increased. The increase in cAMP level was in parallel with an increase in the expression of AChE, whereas transfection of active mutant Gαi cDNA decreased the cAMP level as well as the AChE expression. In addition, expression of collagen-tailed AChE was up-regulated by the cAMP pathway. These findings indicated that CGRP-induced AChE regulation is mediated by the cAMP pathway and represented the first evidence to suggest that the regulation of mRNA synthesis of AChR and AChE can be mediated by the same neuron-derived factor.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1471-4159
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: In vertebrate neuromuscular junctions, the postsynaptic specializations include the accumulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the synaptic basal lamina and the muscle fiber. Several lines of evidence indicate that the presynaptic motor neuron is able to synthesize and secrete AChE at the neuromuscular junctions. By using anti-AChE catalytic subunit, anti-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) catalytic subunit, and anti-AChE collagenous tail monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrated that the motor neurons of chick spinal cord expressed AChE in vivo and the predominant AChE was the globular form of the enzyme. Neither asymmetric AChE nor BuChE was detected in the motor neurons. The molecular mass of AChE catalytic subunit in the motor neuron was ∼105 kDa, which was similar to that of the globular enzyme from low-salt extracts of muscle; both of them were ∼5 kDa smaller than the asymmetric AChE from high-salt extracts of muscle. The level of AChE expression in the motor neurons decreased, as found by immunochemical and enzymatic analysis, during the different stages of the chick's development and after nerve lesion. Thus, the AChE activity at the neuromuscular junctions that is contributed by the presynaptic motor neurons is primarily the globular, not the asymmetric, form of the enzyme, and these contributions decreased toward maturity and after denervation.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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