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  • 1
    ISSN: 1520-4995
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1520-4995
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1520-4995
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Palo Alto, Calif. : Annual Reviews
    Annual Review of Medicine 25 (1974), S. 349-367 
    ISSN: 0066-4219
    Source: Annual Reviews Electronic Back Volume Collection 1932-2001ff
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Palo Alto, Calif. : Annual Reviews
    Annual Review of Nutrition 8 (1988), S. 375-399 
    ISSN: 0199-9885
    Source: Annual Reviews Electronic Back Volume Collection 1932-2001ff
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of cutaneous pathology 24 (1997), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0560
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Increasing evidence suggests involvement of integrins and CD44 isoforms in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, contributing to uncontrolled keratinocyte proliferation, neovascularization, and invasion of inflammatory cells. We have analyzed immunohistochemically in situ expression of integrins (CD29, CDw49b, CDw49c, CDw49e, CDw49f) and CD44 isoforms (CD44 standard, CD44 var/v6, CD44 v10) on frozen sections of normal and psoriatic skin (nonlesional skin, lesional skin before and along with topical calcitriol treatment). We did not observe visual changes of immunoreactivity in normal as compared to nonlesional psoriatic skin, while the staining pattern of CDw49c, CDw49f, and CD29 was severely altered in untreated lesional psoriatic skin. Most markedly, CDw49c, CDw49f, and CD29 were focally upregulated in suprapapillar epidermal compartments of lesional psoriatic skin, a staining pattern that is in accordance with the phenomenon that was described by Pinkus as ‘squirting papilla’. Additionally, an increased proportion of inflammatory and endothelial cells revealed immunoreactivity for CD44(std.) in untreated lesional psoriatic as compared to nonlesional psoriatic or normal skin. After 8 weeks of topical calcitriol treatment (15 μg/g ointment), the staining pattern for CDw49c, CDw49f and CD29 was markedly changed in epidermis of lesional psoriatic skin, reverting to the staining pattern characteristic for the nonlesional psoriatic or normal human skin, although epidermal expression of CDw49f was still upregulated and CDw49e-, CDw49f-, CD29-, and CD44(std.)- immunoreactive inflammatory and endothelial cells were still to be found in the dermal compartment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Copenhagen : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Experimental dermatology 9 (2000), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0625
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: The etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis – one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, hyperproliferative skin disorders of man – have long fascinated dermatologists, pathologists and biologists alike. Here, we have a model disease that offers to study neuroectodermal-mesenchymal interactions in the widest sense possible. Epithelial, endothelial, and hematopoietic cells as well as neurons projecting into the skin apparently all interact with each other to generate the characteristic psoriatic lesion. For decades, the ongoing controversy on the molecular nature, choreography and hierarchy of these complex interactions e.g. between epidermal keratinocytes, T cells, neurotrophils, endothelial cells and sensory nerves has served as a driving force propelling investigative dermatology to ever new horizons. This debate has not only been at the heart of our quest to develop more effective forms of therapy for this socially crippling disease, but it also has profoundly influenced how we view the skin as a whole: the numerous competing theories on the pathogenesis of psoriasis published so far also are reflections on the evolution of mainstream thought in skin biology over the last decades. These days, conventional wisdom – infatuated with a T-cell-centered approach to inflammatory skin diseases – portrays psoriasis as an autoimmune disease, where misguided T lymphocyte activities cause secondary epithelial abnormalities. And yet, as this CONTROVERSIES feature reminds us, some authoritative “pockets of academic resistance” are still quite alive, and interpret psoriasis e.g. as a genetically determined, abnormal epithelial response pattern to infectious and/or physicochemical skin insults. Weighing the corresponding lines of argumentation is not only an intriguing, clinically relevant intellectual exercise, but also serves as a wonderful instrument for questioning our own views of the skin universe and its patterns of deviation from a state of homeostasis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Calcified tissue international 15 (1974), S. 333-339 
    ISSN: 1432-0827
    Keywords: Vitamin D ; Bone ; Resorption ; Calcium
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Physics
    Notes: Abstract A series of analogues of vitamin D have been tested for their ability to stimulate bone resorption in two test systems used previously to investigate the metabolites of vitamine D. These analogues were tested (a) by directly comparing their action on bone explants of mouse half-calvariain vitro, and (b) by injecting them into young mice and measuring the degree of resorptionin vitro when explants were prepared 18 hours after the injection. It is concluded that the key functional groups concerned with enhancing the activity of vitamin D3 are the 1α- and the 25-hydroxyl,both together; the cis ring structure for ring A appears necessary. 1α-Hydroxycholecalciferol (1α-OHD3) is about as active as 25-OHD3 in the direct test, but its potency is much nearer to that of 1,25-(OH)2D3 when tested by the second (indirect) method; it seems likely that 1α-OHD3 is converted into 1,25-(OH)2D3 in vivo. The results are discussed in relation to the designing of analogues for clinical and experimental use.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Osteoporosis international 9 (1999), S. 394-397 
    ISSN: 1433-2965
    Keywords: Key words:Cross calibration of 25(OH)D assay – 25-hydroxyvitamin D assay – 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurement – Interlaboratory comparison – Vitamin D deficiency
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: Vitamin D status is usually assessed by measuring the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration. This mainly depends on sunshine exposure, nutrition and age. Interlaboratory variation may hamper comparison between results from different populations. This study reports cross-calibration of the 25(OH)D assays of five laboratories. In study 1, serum 25(OH)D was measured with three different assays in 104 serum samples from a large vitamin D supplementation study. The mean serum 25(OH)D level was 80% higher when measured by competitive protein binding (CPB) assay than by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while radioimmunoassay (RIA) gave intermediate values. The highest correlation was observed between RIA and HPLC (r= 0.84, p 〈0.01). Of the serum 25(OH)D values in the lowest quartile by HPLC, 25% were not recognized by CPB and 21% were not recognized by RIA as belonging to the lowest quartile. In study 2, the five laboratories analyzed serum 25(OH)D in eight serum samples covering the concentration range very low to high, with five different assays. The differences between the mean values for serum 25(OH)D between the laboratories with the highest and lowest values was 38%. The ranking order of individual samples according to the serum 25(OH)D value was very similar in all laboratories. The results show that 25(OH)D values from different laboratories can not be assumed to be comparable unless a careful cross-calibration has been performed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1433-2965
    Keywords: Key words:1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol – 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol – Vitamin D
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: We determined the quantitative relationships between graded oral dosing with vitamin D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3 for short treatment periods and changes in circulating levels of these substances. The subjects were 116 healthy men (mean age, 28 + 4 years, with usual milk consumption of 40.47 l/day and mean serum 25(OH)D of 67 + 25 nmol/l). They were distributed among nine open-label treatment groups: vitamin D3 (25, 250 or 1250 mg/day for 8 weeks), 25(OH)D3 (10, 20 or 50 mg/day for 4 weeks) and 1,25(OH)2D3 (0.5, 1.0 or 1.0 mg/day for 2 weeks). All treatment occurred between January 3 and April 3. We measured fasting serum calcium, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D3, 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D immediately before and after treatment. In the three groups treated with vitamin D3, mean values for circulating vitamin D3 increased by 13, 137 and 883 nmol/l and serum 25(OH)D increased by 29, 146 and 643 nmol/l for the three dosage groups, respectively. Treatment with 25(OH)D3 increased circulating 25(OH)D by 40, 76 and 206 nmol/l, respectively. Neither compound changed serum 1,25(OH)2D levels. However, treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 increased circulating 1,25(OH)2D by 10, 46 and 60 pmol/l, respectively. Slopes calculated from these data allow the following estimates of mean treatment effects for typical dosage units in healthy 70-kg adults: an 8-week course of vitamin D3 at 10 mg/day (400 IU/day) would raise serum vitamin D by 9 nmol/l and serum 25(OH)D by 11 nmol/l; a 4-week course of 25(OH)D3 at 20 mg/day would raise serum 25(OH)D by 94 nmol/l; and a 2-week course of 1,25(OH)2D3 at 0.5 mg/day would raise serum 1,25(OH)2D by 17 pmol/l.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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