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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Cognitive Brain Research 1 (1993), S. 183-192 
    ISSN: 0926-6410
    Keywords: Auditory word processing ; Event-related potential ; N400 ; Semantic priming ; Syntactic priming
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Medicine , Psychology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Pure and applied geophysics 116 (1978), S. 575-582 
    ISSN: 1420-9136
    Keywords: Chlorofluoromethanes ; Stratospheric chlorine ; Oceanographic tracers
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Depth profiles of the chlorofluoromethanes (CFM), CFCl3 and CF2Cl2, have been obtained together with tritium profiles from water samples collected in the Norwegian Sea between surface and 2800 m depth. CFM analysis was performed by vacuum extraction of the dissolved gases from 500 ml samples of seawater and subsequent gaschromatographic measurement. The CFM concentration decreases with depth to about 10 percent of surface concentration at depths below 2000 m. The same behaviour is found for the tritium content. From a correlation of the CFM and tritium concentration the upper limit of the preindustrial atmospheric CFM levels can be estimated to ≤5 percent of the present day concentrations.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-09-14
    Description: Introduction The most commonly recommended treatment for multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder is exercise. Despite this recommendation, there is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of exercise. The aim of this paper is to describe a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of 2 exercise programmes on outcomes of participants with MDI. Methods and analysis Consenting participants between 12 and 35 years, with non-traumatic MDI will be randomly allocated to participate in either the Rockwood Instability programme or the Watson MDI programme. Both programmes involve 1 consultation per week for 12 weeks with a physiotherapist to prescribe and progress a home exercise programme. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score and Western Ontario Shoulder Index. Secondary outcomes include scapular coordinates, scapular upward rotation angles, muscle strength, symptomatic onset, limiting factor and angle of limiting factor in abduction range, incidence of complete glenohumeral joint dislocation, global rating of change, satisfaction scores, the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire, adverse events and compliance with the home exercise programme. Data will be analysed on intention-to-treat principles and a per protocol basis. Discussion This trial will evaluate whether there are differences in outcomes between the Rockwood and the Watson MDI programmes for participants with MDI. Ethics and dissemination Participant confidentiality will be maintained with publication of results. Ethics approval: Faculty of Health Sciences (FHEC12/201). Trial registration number ACTRN12613001240730 ; Pre-results.
    Keywords: Open access, Rehabilitation medicine, Sports and exercise medicine
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-12-20
    Description: Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through the Latrobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Dissemination of outcome data is planned through both national and international conferences and formal publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12614000812695).
    Keywords: Open access, Rehabilitation medicine, Rheumatology, Sports and exercise medicine
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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