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  • 1
    Keywords: Climatic changes -- Australia -- Congresses.. ; Global warming -- Congresses.. ; Global temperature changes -- Congresses.. ; Climatic changes -- Environmental aspects -- Congresses.. ; Climatic changes -- Social aspects -- Congresses.. ; Greenhouse effect, Atmospheric -- Australia -- Congresses. ; Electronic books.
    Description / Table of Contents: Provides an important snapshot of the issues presented at the Greenhouse 2009 conference.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (299 pages)
    ISBN: 9780643100176
    DDC: 333
    Language: English
    Note: Intro -- Title -- Copyright -- Foreword -- Contents -- Preface -- List of contributors -- 1. Climate change: are we up to the challenge -- 2. Climate change and the Great Crash of 2008 -- Part 1 Climate change science -- 3. Twenty years of Australian Climate Change Science Program research -- 4. Tropical Australia and the Australian monsoon: general assessment and projected changes -- 5. Recent and projected rainfall trends in south-west Australia and the associated shifts in weather systems -- 6. How human-induced aerosols influence the ocean-atmosphere circulation: a review -- 7. Freshwater biodiversity and climate change -- 8. Causes of changing southern hemisphere weather systems -- Part 2 Impacts and adaptation -- 9. Australian agriculture in a climate of change -- 10. Wheat, wine and pie charts: advantages and limits to using current variability to think about future change in South Australia's climate -- 11. Managing extreme heat in the vineyard: some lessons from the 2009 summer heatwave -- 12. Getting on target: energy and water efficiency in Western Australia's housing -- 13. Sustainable energy as the primary tool to ameliorate climate change -- 14. A national energy efficiency program for low-income households: responding equitably to climate change -- 15. Applying a climate change adaptation decision framework for the Adelaide-Mt Lofty Ranges -- 16. Responding to oil vulnerability and climate change in our cities -- 17. Managing climate risk in human settlements -- 18. Adapting infrastructure for climate change impacts -- 19. A critical look at the state of climate adaptation planning -- Part 3 Communicating climate change -- 20. Rising above hot air: a method for exploring attitudes towards zero-carbon lifestyles. , 21. Investigating the effectiveness of Energymark: changing public perceptions and behaviours using a longitudinal kitchen table approach -- 22. Talking climate change with the bush -- 23. Using Google Earth to visualise climate change scenarios in south-west Victoria -- Index.
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  • 2
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Newark : : American Geophysical Union,
    Keywords: Electronic books.
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 online resource (525 pages)
    ISBN: 9781119548157
    Series Statement: Geophysical Monograph Ser. ; v.254
    Language: English
    Note: Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- PREFACE -- Section I Introduction -- Chapter 1 Introduction to El Niño Southern Oscillation in a Changing Climate -- 1.1. INTRODUCTION -- 1.2. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND -- 1.3. RECENT PROGRESS AND CURRENT CHALLENGES -- 1.4. ENSO IN A CHANGING CLIMATE -- 1.5. CONCLUSION -- ENSO INDICES -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 2 ENSO in the Global Climate System -- 2.1. THE CLIMATE SYSTEM -- 2.2. THE TROPICAL PACIFIC AND MEAN ANNUAL CYCLE -- 2.3. EL NIÑO-SOUTHERN OSCILLATION -- 2.4. TELECONNECTIONS AND MODES OF VARIABILITY -- 2.5. CLIMATE CHANGE -- 2.6. IMPACTS -- REFERENCES -- Section II Observations -- Chapter 3 ENSO Observations -- 3.1. INTRODUCTION -- 3.2. A BRIEF HISTORY -- 3.3. ENSO VARIABILITY -- 3.4. DATA PRODUCTS -- 3.5. OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC REANALYSES -- 3.6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 4 ENSO Diversity -- 4.1. INTRODUCTION -- 4.2. CHARACTERISTICS OF ENSO DIVERSITY -- 4.3. EQUATORIAL DYNAMICAL PROCESSES UNDERLYING ENSO DIVERSITY -- 4.4. PRECURSORS AND PREDICTABILITY OF ENSO DIVERSITY -- 4.5. LOW-FREQUENCY VARIATIONS OF ENSO DIVERSITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE -- 4.6. ENSO DIVERSITY REPRESENTATION IN CLIMATE MODELS -- 4.7. CONCLUSIONS -- APPENDIX: INDICES OF EL NIÑO DIVERSITY -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 5 Past ENSO Variability: Reconstructions, Models, and Implications -- 5.1. CLIMATIC CONTEXT FOR PALEO-ENSO RECONSTRUCTION -- 5.2. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON PALEO-ENSO BEHAVIOR -- 5.3. QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES TO ENSO RECONSTRUCTION -- 5.4. PALEO-CONSTRAINTS ON ENSO DYNAMICS -- 5.5. DISCUSSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- APPENDIX: DATA CITATIONS -- Section III Theories and Dynamics -- Chapter 6 Simple ENSO Models -- 6.1. INTRODUCTION -- 6.2. COUPLED LINEAR INSTABILITY. , 6.3. RECHARGE OSCILLATOR (RO) AND BJERKNES-WYRTKI-JIN (BWJ) INDEX -- 6.4. FACTORS CONTROLLING ENSO AMPLITUDE, PERIODICITY, PHASE-LOCKING, ASYMMETRY, AND NONLINEAR RECTIFICATION -- 6.5. OUTLOOK -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE CZ MODEL -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 7 ENSO Irregularity and Asymmetry -- 7.1. INTRODUCTION -- 7.2. IRREGULARITY -- 7.3. ENSO AMPLITUDE ASYMMETRY -- 7.4. ENSO EVOLUTION ASYMMETRY -- 7.5. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 8 ENSO Low-Frequency Modulation and Mean State Interactions -- 8.1. INTRODUCTION -- 8.2. INTRINSICALLY GENERATED MODULATION OF ENSO -- 8.3. EXTERNALLY DRIVEN MODULATION OF ENSO -- 8.4. ENSO AND THE PACIFIC DECADAL OSCILLATION -- 8.5. ENSO DECADAL MODULATION IN OCEAN ENERGETICS -- 8.6. PREDICTION OF ENSO DECADAL MODULATION -- 8.7. ENSO MODULATION AND THE GLOBAL WARMING HIATUS -- 8.8. CONCLUSIONS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Section IV Modeling and Prediction -- Chapter 9 ENSO Modeling: History, Progress, and Challenges -- 9.1. HISTORY OF ENSO SIMULATION IN COMPLEX MODELS -- 9.2. BENEFITS OF A HIERARCHY OF MODELS -- 9.3. USING MODELS FOR ENSO UNDERSTANDING -- 9.4. EVALUATING ENSO IN MODELS -- 9.5. CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 10 ENSO Prediction -- 10.1. HISTORY OF ENSO FORECASTING -- 10.2. ENSO PREDICTABILITY -- 10.3. ENSO PREDICTION SKILL -- 10.4. DECADAL VARIATION IN ENSO AND ITS SKILL -- 10.5. RECENT ENSO PREDICTION CHALLENGES -- 10.6. CONCLUDING REMARKS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Section V Remote and External Forcing -- Chapter 11 ENSO Remote Forcing: Influence of Climate Variability Outside the Tropical Pacific -- 11.1. INTRODUCTION -- 11.2. INDIAN OCEAN -- 11.3. ATLANTIC OCEAN -- 11.4. EXTRATROPICAL PACIFIC -- 11.5. DISCUSSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES. , Chapter 12 The Effect of Strong Volcanic Eruptions on ENSO -- 12.1. INTRODUCTION -- 12.2. VOLCANIC FORCING OF CLIMATE -- 12.3. PALEOCLIMATE EVIDENCE -- 12.4. MODEL EVIDENCE AND DYNAMICS -- 12.5. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 13 ENSO Response to Greenhouse Forcing -- 13.1. INTRODUCTION -- 13.2. FORCED CHANGES IN BACKGROUND CLIMATE -- 13.3. ELUSIVE PROJECTIONS OF ENSO -- 13.4. PROCESS-BASED ENSO PROJECTIONS -- 13.5. UNCERTAINTIES AND MODEL BIASES -- 13.6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUDING REMARKS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Section VI Teleconnections and Impacts -- Chapter 14 ENSO Atmospheric Teleconnections -- 14.1. INTRODUCTION -- 14.2. TELECONNECTIONS TO OTHER OCEAN BASINS -- 14.3. TELECONNECTIONS TO LAND REGIONS -- 14.4. ENSO TELECONNECTIONS IN A WARMER WORLD -- 14.5. SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 15 ENSO Oceanic Teleconnections -- 15.1. INTRODUCTION -- 15.2. DIRECTLY FORCED CHANGES IN THE TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN CIRCULATION -- 15.3. EXTRATROPICAL TELECONNECTIONS IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN VIA PLANETARY WAVES -- 15.4. INTERBASIN OCEANIC TELECONNECTION -- 15.5. MIXED ATMOSPHERIC-OCEANIC TELECONNECTIONS -- 15.6. CONCLUSIONS: PROJECTED CHANGES IN OCEANIC PATHWAYS RELATED TO ENSO CHANGES IN A WARMING WORLD -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 16 Impact of El Niño on Weather and Climate Extremes -- 16.1. INTRODUCTION -- 16.2. EXTREME CLIMATE IMPACTS -- 16.3. PREDICTABILITY: HOW AND HOW WELL DO WE PREDICT ENSO'S EXTREME IMPACTS? -- 16.4. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 17 ENSO and Tropical Cyclones -- 17.1. INTRODUCTION -- 17.2. WESTERN NORTH PACIFIC (WNP) TROPICAL CYCLONES -- 17.3. CENTRAL AND EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC (CEP) TCs -- 17.4. NORTH ATLANTIC TCs -- 17.5. NORTH INDIAN OCEAN (NIO) TCs. , 17.6. SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE TCs -- 17.7. TROPICAL CYCLONES AND CLIMATE CHANGE -- 17.8. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 18 ENSO-Driven Ocean Extremes and Their Ecosystem Impacts -- 18.1. INTRODUCTION -- 18.2. EXTREMES IN SEA LEVEL AND SEAWATER TEMPERATURE -- 18.3. IMPACTS ON SHALLOW-WATER MARINE ECOSYSTEMS -- 18.4. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 19 ENSO Impact on Marine Fisheries and Ecosystems -- 19.1. INTRODUCTION -- 19.2. THE HUMBOLDT CURRENT SYSTEM -- 19.3. THE EQUATORIAL PACIFIC AND TROPICAL TUNA FISHERIES -- 19.4. THE CENTRAL NORTH PACIFIC -- 19.5. THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT ECOSYSTEM -- 19.6. THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC SUBPOLAR GYRE -- 19.7. THE NORTHWEST PACIFIC -- 19.8. THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC -- 19.9. DISCUSSION -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTs -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 20 ENSO and the Carbon Cycle -- 20.1. INTRODUCTION -- 20.2. CARBON CYCLE VARIABILITY AND ITS CORRELATION WITH ENSO -- 20.3. PROCESSES INVOLVED IN ENSO-CARBON CYCLE INTERACTIONS -- 20.4. IMPACTS OF MAJOR EL NIÑO EVENTS ON THE GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE -- 20.5. ROLE OF ENSO IN PREDICTING THE FUTURE BEHAVIOR OF THE EARTH SYSTEM -- 20.6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- REFERENCES -- Section VII Closing -- Chapter 21 ENSO in a Changing Climate: Challenges, Paleo-Perspectives, and Outlook -- 21.1. INTRODUCTION -- 21.2. SEASONAL CYCLE-ENSO INTERACTIONS -- 21.3. FORCED ENSO CHANGES VS. INTERNAL VARIABILITY, AND THE POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING CONFIDENCE IN ENSO PROJECTIONS -- 21.4. CONCLUDING REMARKS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- REFERENCES -- GLOSSARY -- INDEX -- EULA.
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  • 3
    Book
    Book
    Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-American Geophysical Union
    Keywords: Climatic changes ; Ocean-atmosphere interaction ; El Niño Current
    Description / Table of Contents: "Comprehensive and up-to-date information on Earth's most dominant year-to-year climate variation The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Pacific Ocean has major worldwide social and economic consequences through its global scale effects on atmospheric and oceanic circulation, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and other natural systems. Ongoing climate change is projected to significantly alter ENSO's dynamics and impacts. El Niño Southern Oscillation in a Changing Climate presents the latest theories, models, and observations, and explores the challenges of forecasting ENSO as the climate continues to change. Volume highlights include: Historical background on ENSO and its societal consequences - Review of key El Niño (ENSO warm phase) and La Niña (ENSO cold phase) characteristics - Mathematical description of the underlying physical processes that generate ENSO variations - Conceptual framework for understanding ENSO changes on decadal and longer time scales, including the response to greenhouse gas forcing ENSO impacts on extreme ocean, weather, and climate events, including tropical cyclones, and how ENSO affects fisheries and the global carbon cycle - Advances in modeling, paleo-reconstructions, and operational climate forecasting - Future projections of ENSO and its impacts - Factors influencing ENSO events, such as inter-basin climate interactions and volcanic eruptions"--
    Type of Medium: Book
    Pages: XVI, 506 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Edition: First edition
    ISBN: 9781119548126
    Series Statement: Geophysical monograph series 253
    DDC: 551.5/24648
    Language: English
    Note: Includes index , Includes bibliographical references and index
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  • 4
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-American Geophysical Union
    Keywords: Climatic changes ; Ocean-atmosphere interaction ; Climatic changes ; Ocean-atmosphere interaction ; El Niño Current ; Pacific Ocean ; El Niño Current
    Description / Table of Contents: "Comprehensive and up-to-date information on Earth's most dominant year-to-year climate variation The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Pacific Ocean has major worldwide social and economic consequences through its global scale effects on atmospheric and oceanic circulation, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and other natural systems. Ongoing climate change is projected to significantly alter ENSO's dynamics and impacts. El Niño Southern Oscillation in a Changing Climate presents the latest theories, models, and observations, and explores the challenges of forecasting ENSO as the climate continues to change. Volume highlights include: Historical background on ENSO and its societal consequences - Review of key El Niño (ENSO warm phase) and La Niña (ENSO cold phase) characteristics - Mathematical description of the underlying physical processes that generate ENSO variations - Conceptual framework for understanding ENSO changes on decadal and longer time scales, including the response to greenhouse gas forcing ENSO impacts on extreme ocean, weather, and climate events, including tropical cyclones, and how ENSO affects fisheries and the global carbon cycle - Advances in modeling, paleo-reconstructions, and operational climate forecasting - Future projections of ENSO and its impacts - Factors influencing ENSO events, such as inter-basin climate interactions and volcanic eruptions"--
    Type of Medium: Online Resource
    Pages: 1 Online-Ressource
    Edition: First edition
    ISBN: 9781119548119 , 111954811X
    Series Statement: Geophysical monograph series
    DDC: 551.5/24648
    Language: English
    Note: Includes index , Includes bibliographical references and index
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-08-10
    Description: The Kuroshio Current (KC) is the northward branch of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPG) and exerts influence on the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties of downstream regions in the Pacific Ocean. Resolving long-term changes in the flow of the KC water masses is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of the Pacific's role in global ocean and climate variability. Here, we reconstruct changes in KC dynamics over the past 20 ka based on grain-size spectra, clay mineral, and Sr–Nd isotope constraints of sediments from the northern Okinawa Trough. Combined with published sediment records surrounding the NPG, we suggest that the KC remained in the Okinawa Trough throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Together with Earth-System-Model simulations, our results additionally indicate that KC intensified considerably during the early Holocene (EH). The synchronous establishment of the KC “water barrier” and the modern circulation pattern during the EH highstand shaped the sediment transport patterns. This is ascribed to the precession-induced increase in the occurrence of La Niña-like state and the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon. The synchronicity of the shifts in the intensity of the KC, Kuroshio extension, and El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability may further indicate that the western branch of the NPG has been subject to basin-scale changes in wind stress curl over the North Pacific in response to low-latitude insolation. Superimposed on this long-term trend are high-amplitude, large century, and millennial-scale variations during last 5 ka, which are ascribed to the advent of modern ENSO when the equatorial oceans experienced stronger insolation during the boreal winter.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1573-868X
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract We examine the difference in modeled thermohaline circulation under an atmosphere with no heat capacity (NHC) and infinite heat capacity (IHC) in a series of numerical experiments using the Bryan/Cox OGCM. An NHC atmosphere allows ocean sea surface temperatures to respond to changes in oceanic poleward heat transport, inferring an atmosphere that is allowed to seek its equilibrium temperature, whereas an IHC atmosphere does not. This is responsible for the following different behaviour patterns under the two atmospheres: 1) under NHC atmosphere, oceanic thermal oscillation persists, whereas under IHC atmosphere it does not; 2) under NHC atmosphere, the oceanic thermohaline circulation is less sensitive to high latitude freshening than under IHC atmosphere; 3) under either atmosphere, multiple equilibrium solutions are possible. However, under NHC atmosphere, two equilibria of the thermohaline circulation are generated in the same way as in the GFDL fully coupled model, while under IHC atmosphere, they are not.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2017-01-05
    Description: Author Posting. © The Author(s), 2011. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Nature Publishing Group for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Nature Climate Change 2 (2012): 161-166, doi:10.1038/nclimate1353.
    Description: Subtropical western boundary currents are warm, fast flowing currents that form on the western side of ocean basins. They carry warm tropical water to the mid-latitudes and vent large amounts of heat and moisture to the atmosphere along their paths, affecting atmospheric jet streams and mid-latitude storms, as well as ocean carbon uptake. The possibility that these highly energetic and nonlinear currents might change under greenhouse gas forcing has raised significant concerns, but detecting such changes is challenging owing to limited observations. Here, using reconstructed sea surface temperature datasets and newly developed century-long ocean and atmosphere reanalysis products, we find that the post-1900 surface ocean warming rate over the path of these currents is two to three times faster than the global mean surface ocean warming rate. The accelerated warming is associated with a synchronous poleward shift and/or intensification of global subtropical western boundary currents in conjunction with a systematic change in winds over both hemispheres. This enhanced warming may reduce ocean's ability to absorb anthropogenic carbon dioxide over these regions. However, uncertainties in detection and attribution of these warming trends remain, pointing to a need for a long-term monitoring network of the global western boundary currents and their extensions.
    Description: This work is supported by China National Key Basic Research Project (2007CB411800) and National Natural Science Foundation Projects (40788002, 40921004). WC is supported by the Australian Climate Change Science program and the Southeast Australia Climate Initiative. HN is supported in part by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology through Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas #2205 and by the Japanese Ministry of Environment through Global Environment Research Fund (S-5). MJM is supported by NOAA’s Climate Program Office.
    Description: 2012-07-29
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Preprint
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-10-05
    Description: Author Posting. © The Author(s), 2014. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Nature Publishing Group for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Nature Climate Change 5 (2015): 4-6, doi:10.1038/nclimate2482.
    Description: A sustainable global ocean observation system requires timely implementation of a global ocean observation framework. The recent Qingdao Global Ocean Summit offers an effective mechanism for a coherent institutional response to emerging scientific and societal drivers, and for promoting the capacity building in developing economies that is essential for increasing the value and broadening the funding base of the observation system.
    Description: 2015-06-18
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Preprint
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: Subtropical western boundary currents are warm, fast-flowing currents that form on the western side of ocean basins. They carry warm tropical water to the mid-latitudes and vent large amounts of heat and moisture to the atmosphere along their paths, affecting atmospheric jet streams and mid-latitude storms, as well as ocean carbon uptake1, 2, 3, 4. The possibility that these highly energetic currents might change under greenhouse-gas forcing has raised significant concerns5, 6, 7, but detecting such changes is challenging owing to limited observations. Here, using reconstructed sea surface temperature datasets and century-long ocean and atmosphere reanalysis products, we find that the post-1900 surface ocean warming rate over the path of these currents is two to three times faster than the global mean surface ocean warming rate. The accelerated warming is associated with a synchronous poleward shift and/or intensification of global subtropical western boundary currents in conjunction with a systematic change in winds over both hemispheres. This enhanced warming may reduce the ability of the oceans to absorb anthropogenic carbon dioxide over these regions. However, uncertainties in detection and attribution of these warming trends remain, pointing to a need for a long-term monitoring network of the global western boundary currents and their extensions.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Format: text
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  • 10
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    Nature Publishing Group
    In:  Nature Climate Change, 5 (1). pp. 4-6.
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: A sustainable global ocean observation system requires timely implementation of the framework for ocean observing. The recent Qingdao Global Ocean Summit highlighted the need for a more coherent institutional response to maintain an integrated ocean-observing system.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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